Sony PCM-D10

The Sony PCM-D10

Sony has been toying with our audio affections for years. Their PCM-D50 was a favorite recorder of ours for a long time, until the company suddenly stopped making it.

We consoled ourselves with their more consumer-oriented PCM-M10, which was much smaller, half the price, and still sounded great, with extraordinary battery life. It remains one of our favorite affordable recorders, but. . . you guessed it: Sony stopped making that model too.

Sony eventually released the PCM-D100, offering high-resolution recording formats, with excellent built-in mics, and overall pristine sound quality. It’s a great recorder, but we remain daunted by the high price tag: approximately $775 at press time.

All three of those recorders featured excellent sound quality, but we’d always been frustrated by the minijack input, which was the only way to connect external mics. These Sony recorders have all featured very good built-in mics, but for most audio documentary work, we prefer using external microphones. Although the sound quality has always been good when using the mini jack mic input, we’ve always hoped for a Sony recorder with XLR mic inputs. XLRs are more robust connectors — after lots of use, we’ve experienced failures of the mini inputs, a problem that is difficult and expensive to repair.

Additionally, a mini input eliminates the option of sending phantom power to condenser mics from the recorder. Some condenser mics have the option of an internal battery for phantom power, but not all do, so an XLR input provides not only a more robust connection, but also expands the pool of mics that can be used.

We are quite excited to report that Sony has finally made a portable audio recorder with XLR inputs. The PCM-D10 offers many of the advantages of the more-expensive D100, such as high resolution recording, and excellent built-in mics, at a lower price ($500 USD.) There’s also a stereo mini input, which can provide plug-in power if you have microphones that use that connector and powering scheme. The D100 remains Sony’s flagship recorder in terms of sound quality, but the D10 offers several practical advantages. The latching XLR inputs for external mics inspire confidence, the multiple physical switches and smooth input gain knob make it very easy to configure and use, and its excellent sound quality makes its price, which is higher than similar recorders from Tascam and Zoom, easier to swallow.

Buy the Sony PCM-D10 from Amazon.com>>
Buy the Sony PCM-D10 from B&H>>

(purchasing through these links supports Transom.org)

Right out of the box, it’s quite striking how large the PCM-D10 is. It’s much longer and wider than similar recorders from Tascam and Zoom. It’s lighter than it looks, but it’s still hefty: 480 grams (a little over a pound) which is close to 80 grams heavier than the Sony PCM-D100, about 50 grams heavier than the Tascam DR-100mkIII (which has a built-in rechargeable battery) and almost 200 grams heavier than the Zoom H5.

It’s not uncomfortable to hold, but if you have small hands, it might feel cumbersome. When held in the right hand, the input gain knob falls pretty comfortably under one’s thumb, making it easy to make gradual, silent adjustments to the record levels in real time. The dial is concentric — the left and right channels can be offset against one another — but they also move tightly together. It’s a real analog input potentiometer, so adjustments are smooth: there’s no stair-stepping as digital gain controls can cause.

This recorder may be large, but there’s good reason for that: in addition to the XLR jacks, there are many physical switches and buttons for common functions. It’s quite refreshing to not have to search through menus to make basic adjustments. There are switches to select the built-in mics or the external XLRs. Another set of switches to select mic or line-level on each XLR input independently. Yet another switch to toggle between mic or line-level for the mini input. There are even independent switches to turn phantom power on or off on each channel.

There’s a dedicated button that selects the source for headphone monitoring: left channel, right channel or stereo. This is useful when recording different sources to the external inputs, such as a lavalier on one channel and a boom mic on the other. The ability to toggle through those inputs with a few simple pushes to a dedicated button is very convenient.

Right next to the headphone source button is a dedicated button that lights the display.

The headphone volume control is on an up/down toggle, which is disappointing, and the maximum volume is not great, but that’s one of the few shortcomings in the D10’s design.

All of these hardware switches allow for a logical, streamlined menu system. Most options are quickly accessed without digging through multiple layers of sub-menus. Even so, there’s a lot of flexibility in setting sample rates and bit-depths, which can go as high as 24-bit and 192 kHz. It’s simple to toggle between stereo or mono recording, and when mono is selected, the left input is active, and the headphones automatically switch to monitoring that input in mono. Even the built-in mics follow this pattern: if mono recording is selected, only the left mic capsule is active.

Sony has put a lot of focus on the quality of the built-in microphones. They have an extended frequency response, up to 40 kHz, which can be very handy when recording at 96 kHz sample rate, or higher, and then later pitching those recordings down in an editing program. This can bring ultrasonic sounds, such as bat vocalizations, into the audible range, or can simply transform other sounds, which is appealing to sound designers.

For many recordists, high sample rates and extended frequency response are of no practical use. For most radio, film or podcast use, 44.1 or 48 kHz is sufficient. Regardless of their specs, those built-in mics do sound quite good, and they can be very useful for recording ambiences, musical performances, and other events.

As is the case with most built-in mics on hand-held recorders, they are very sensitive to handling noise, and wind. When using the built-in mics, it is best to mount the recorder on a stand, or use an isolation mount, to avoid transmitting thumps and rumbles through the case. The mics are so sensitive that a windscreen is necessary even in the absence of wind: a subtle movement of the recorder, or gentle air movement from ventilation airflow, will create wind rumble. The D10 ships with a simple foam windscreen, which helps a little, but some aftermarket additional wind protection, such as a furry “windjammer” will likely be necessary, especially if used outdoors. Oddly, there don’t seem to be furry covers specifically designed for the D10 – yet – but it’s highly likely that Sony, Rycote, and other companies will offer them for sale soon. I was able to stretch a Sony furry cover designed for the M10 over the end of the D10, but it’s a tight fit, hopefully there will be a properly-proportioned windjammer available soon.

Unlike some similarly-constructed recorders, such as the Zoom H5, the PCM-D10 cannot record the built-in mics and the external XLR inputs simultaneously. On the D10, a hardware switch selects between one set of inputs or the other. If the recorder is switched to the internal input, plugging a mini cable into the mic/line input on the upper right edge of the recorder disconnects the built-in mics and automatically makes that mini input active.

The sound quality of that mini input seems to be about the same as with the XLRs, so either input can be used with good results. And that’s the most important thing: the sound quality of the D10 is quite good, whether using the built-in mics or external mics. Dual analog-to-digital converters provide excellent audio performance, especially when using the optional High S/N (Signal-to-Noise) Mode. This allows clean recordings at low audio levels, so input gain can be set conservatively, allowing plenty of headroom for peaks, while retaining clean recording quality.

Here are some examples:

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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”
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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”
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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”
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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”
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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”
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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”
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Listen to “Sony PCM-D10”

The PCM-D10 features 16 GB of internal memory, as well as a slot for a standard SD card, which can accept up to 256 GB cards. A menu setting can turn-on cross-memory recording, so that recordings will cascade from the internal memory to the external SD card, when internal memory is full.

A few features can be controlled remotely using a smartphone app, available for both iOs and Android. Because the input gain is on an analog dial, that cannot be adjusted remotely through the app, but transport controls, marking, metering, and more, are available on your smartphone.

The D10 is powered by 4 AA batteries, and although battery life is impacted by file format, phantom power usage, and other factors, initial testing indicates that those 4 AAs last a very long time. The manual claims 32 hours or more, and while we haven’t had the recorder running for that long continuously, after extensive use over several days, we’re still on the first set of four alkaline AAs, so it does appear that the machine can run for a full-day, or even more, without changing batteries.

Buy the Sony PCM-D10 from Amazon.com>>

Buy the Sony PCM-D10 from B&H>>

The field recorder market has become crowded with devices like this, each with pros and cons. Zoom’s H5 sells for a much lower price, is smaller and lighter, and can record the built-in mics and external XLR inputs at the same time. Tascam’s DR-100mkIII has a very convenient rechargeable battery, a bigger, brighter display, and it sells for $100 less than the D10. Zoom’s F4 and Sound Device’s MixPre3 are only about $150 more than the D10, and those recorders offer flexible multitrack capabilities, timecode, and other professional features. But the Sony PCM-D10 offers a notable ease-of-use due to its multiple physical switches, and its built-in microphones are better than those on the Zoom or Tascam, its overall sound quality is as good or better than the similar recorders, and its long battery life is very convenient. The PCM-D10 is just a little too large, a little too heavy, and a little too expensive, yet . . . it’s a serious contender for best-in-class for a handheld stereo recorder.

Jeff Towne

About
Jeff Towne

During more than 25 years as a producer of the nationally-syndicated radio program Echoes. Jeff Towne has recorded interviews and musical performances in locations ranging from closets to cathedrals, outdoor stages to professional studios, turning them into radio shows and podcasts. Jeff is also the Tools Editor for Transom.org, a Peabody Award-winning website dedicated to channeling new voices to public media. At Transom, he reviews field recorders, microphones and software, helping both beginning and experienced audio producers choose their tools. In his spare time, Jeff will probably be taking pictures of his lunch in that little restaurant with the strange name that you've been wondering about. 

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  • Amir

    6.20.19

    Reply

    Thanks, Jeff, for your in-depth review. I’m a long-time reader of your recorder reviews, and your inimitable writing keeps returning me to this website.
    As a PCM-D100 owner I’m very much tempted to upgrade to the D10 — mostly because of its XLR inputs. Some also believe that its internal mics are better than those of the D100. And, as a visually impaired user, I like its physical switches a lot. Not sure if we can transfer our recordings to, say, laptops or tablets via the recorder’s Bluetooth capabilities — guess that’s not possible.
    Keep up the good work.

    • Jeff Towne

      6.20.19

      Reply

      Hi Amir, glad you’re finding the reviews helpful! Although I reviewed the Sony PCM-D100 (and liked it – except for the minijack input and high price!) I didn’t have it in front of me to do a direct head-to-head comparison with the D10. I’ve read some reviews in nature-recording forums that have complained that the D10’s mic preamps are noisier than the D100, and even noisier than the M10! And that might be true, but sometimes those differences are situational, and only rear their heads in specific circumstances.

      I’ve chosen to take a more pragmatic approach when reviewing these machines: I just listen to them, and provide sound files for the readers to listen to. Charts and scopes can provide useful information, but I’m convinced that it’s more important how the devices sound in real-world scenarios. So, if you do recording of very quiet ambiences, using very low-noise mics, you might find the D10 to be inferior to the D100. But for the situations more common to the readers of Transom.org: doing interviews with common ENG mics, the D10 sounds pretty great to me!

      Again, I didn’t have the two recorders side-by-side, so I can’t make any definitive comparisons. I’m not convinced that the D10’s built-im mics are better than the D100’s, but the D10’s mics are very good. The mics on both recorders sound pretty amazing to me!

      The PCM-D100 is a very fine machine, and may very well have quieter mics and preamps, but the practical advantages of the D10: having locking XLR inputs with phantom power; having convenient switches, and room to get your fingers on them; having a slightly more pleasing input gain knob – closer to the D50’s, which we loved… all add up to the D10 being a decent alternative, even if its noise specs are not quite as good. The D10’s battery life is as good, or better, than the D100, which is kind of amazing, given that using phantom power usually reduces battery life significantly. The D10 only has 16 GB of internal memory, compared to the D100’s 32 GB, but you can put larger SD cards in the D10, and large high-quality SD cards are quite affordable these days, so it makes sense to just put a nice big SD card in the D10 and not worry about limits!

      You’re right: you cannot transfer audio over bluetooth, that’s used entirely for remote control, via a smartphone app, or for listening to playback. It does NOT transmit audio from an active recording to bluetooth headphones. That may be possible someday (and would be really cool to not worry about a headphone cable!!) but I think there’s currently too much of a delay in bluetooth audio to make that practical.

      So, I’m not sure whether I’d suggest switching from a D100 to a D10. If the XLRs would be a big help, that might make it worthwhile. If you’re mostly using the built-in mics, I might stick with the D100. If more hardware switches would make it easier to use, the D10 might win. I prefer the headphone volume knob on the D100 to the up-down toggle on the D10, but the D10’s ability to quickly switch from monitoring the left channel, to the right, to stereo, is super-cool if you ever need to do that!

      The good news is that you’ll be in good shape with either the D100 or the D10!

      • Amir

        7.13.19

        Thanks, Jeff, for such a detailed reply — it’s a full-blown review disguised as a comment!
        Having read your comment and also having taken a look at your great SoundDevices MixPre-3 review, I’m now tempted to keep the D100, forgo the D10, and purchase a MixPre-3. If the D10 could also function as an audio interface — like the Zoom H6, I’d get it in a wink. But, my issues with touch screens aside as a visually impaired user, the MixPre-3 sounds like a great investment especially given the $500 price tag of the D10.
        Thanks again for sharing your insights with us.

  • Jake Warga

    6.20.19

    Reply

    I bought one, then returned it. Felt like I was walking around with a size 14 shoe in my hand. Sony has finally invented the Marantz recorder.

    • Jeff Towne

      7.22.19

      Reply

      Ha! – I hear ya, the Sony D10 is a but cumbersome, compared to some of the sleeker machines out now. But it’s not QUITE as clunky as a Marantz 660 or 661! I’m of two minds on the size thing: on one hand I do like having something very compact, like the Sony PCM-M10 (why did they stop making that?!?!) but on the other hand, a larger case makes it easier to access switches and knobs, easier to read screens, etc. As much as I love the Sound Devices MixPre series, I occasionally have trouble working the touchscreen and the tightly-packed gain knobs, with my (apparently) large fingers. So I might put-up with a slightly clunky design, if it’s easy to operate, which the Sony D10 is…

  • Beth Surdut

    6.20.19

    Reply

    Since my focus is creating The Art of Paying Attention nature pieces, you had me at bat recording. I was tempted to buy, however, you pointed out at this recorder might not be appropriate for small hands. I’ve never used a true handheld, having been schlepping a PMD661. I’d be delighted if you posted a comparison of the best recorders for nature sounds. https://www.azpm.org/s/40485-the-art-of-paying-attention-bats/

    • Jeff Towne

      7.22.19

      Reply

      Hi Beth. I’m reluctant to make any definitive pronouncements about nature recording: that’s a pretty specialized field, and I don’t have enough experience in that particular practice to consider myself expert! I’ve recorded some random nature sounds over the years, but I haven’t traveled to remote locations and recorded specific natural sounds for extended periods of time, especially very quiet ambience, or specialized sounds (like bat vocalizations or underwater sounds.) I do monitor some discussion groups about that kind of thing, and have learned some helpful techniques and approaches to recording in the field, but I wouldn’t consider myself an expert! That said, as I recently replied to another comment: the Sony D-100, the Sound Devices MixPre3 or MixPre6; the Zoom F4 or F8, seem to be favorite recorders in the nature recording scene. The new Zoom F6 (released summer of 2019) is creating some excitement, it appears to have very quiet mic preamps, and a huge dynamic range, in a small package.

      I reviewed the Olympus LS-100 a few years ago, and I did NOT like it: I think the operation of the recorder is extremely unintuitive, and frustrating. But, it does sound quite good, so if you can put up with some annoyance in running the recorder, you might find one of those used for $200-$300, if budget is an issue!

      In any case, if you want to record bats, you might want to be sure to use a recorder that can record at 96 kHz, or even better, at 192 kHz. I think that’s overkill for most field recording, but if you might want to slow the recording down, for sound-design reasons, or for accessing super-high frequencies like bat calls, the high sample rates are crucial for retaining quality when pitching the audio down.

  • Mathew

    7.22.19

    Reply

    Jeff,

    Thanks so much for your review of the Sony D1!. It finally convinced me to purchase the recorder when I was on the fence about it. I now have the D100, D10, and A10. Each serves a unique need. The A10 is a great “always carry around” recorder that works well with PIP mics.

    I was mainly concerned about the self-noise issue. When I got the recorder I tested with 3 mics: the Shure SM7B, the Sennheiser MD46, and later with Sanken COS 11D lavalier mics. At first I was getting noticeable self-noise. Not a complete surprise with the needy Shure SM7B. But the D100 handles that mic effortlessly. I got less, but still noticeable noise, when using the Sennheiser MD46.

    A bit later I changed my recording settings from having the limiter on to switching to turning the limiter off and using the High S/N mode. Under that setting self-noise seems to be much less. I did not thoroughly test this, so I may be wrong, but it’s possible that the noticeable self-noise was partly a result of using recording settings that did not implement High S/N mode.

    At any rate, using the Sanken COS 11D mics, in High S/N mode, results in no self-noise. With the Sennheiser MD46 it is there but very very low.

    Bottom line: self-noise is not a problem for my real life usage. Now I can record conversations/interviews really nicely with the D10. Two XLR inputs, providing phantom power, and great with batteries! Quite a nice combo. All packs up in a very effective “go bag” for recording conversations.

    I would not have bought this product without your review. Thanks so much as it solves a real gap in my recording needs.

    • Jeff Towne

      7.22.19

      Reply

      So glad to hear that the review was helpful, and that you’re liking the recorder. Before I got the recorder to test, I too had read about background noise issues in some nature-recording forums, so I was worried, but found that in real-world use, it just wasn’t an issue. The Shure SM-7B is a particularly tricky mic that needs tons of gain, it’s not really meant to be used with a field recorder! But even so, as you discovered, with High S/N mode, and a realistic gain staging, the Sony D-10 can work pretty well with just about any mic. It might indeed be a bit noisier than the D-100, or a Sound Devices MixPre, etc, with extremely low-noise mics, when recording VERY quiet ambiences, but that’s a pretty specific scenario. For general sound collection for documentaries, for interviews, etc, it performs very well, with no noose problems that I encountered. Hope it serves you well!

  • Ben Williams

    8.04.19

    Reply

    I’m considering purchasing the Sony D-10 mainly to use in conjunction with a Bose Tone Match mixer for live recording of music event. The T8 Tone Match has two XLR analog outputs:

    https://www.bose.com/en_us/products/speakers/portable_pa_speakers/t8s_tonematch_mixer.html

    Do you have any experience with a set up like this, using the XLR outputs from a sound system running to the XLR inputs on the D-10 that is designed for microphones? Thanks!

  • Greg

    8.12.19

    Reply

    Hi! Thank you for the great reviews. I was wondering how the Sony PCM-D10 stacks-up against the Zoom H6. I believe the D10 is 2 channel stereo and the H6 can be 4 to 6 channel (with capsule).

    How do the two compare when it comes to the ever popular “noise floor”? Is one better than the other at recording low volume without additional hiss?

    The Internet is filled with folks who proclaim the Sony PCM-D100 to be the best of the best when it comes to low volume, clean audio recording. I think it can cleanly record a gnat fart. Just kidding.

    I won’t hold you to it, but if you were making the purchase would you be more inclined to purchase the D10 or the H6 and why?

    Thanks very much! I love this sight and the reviews. I found transom.org by accident and I am very glad I did.

  • Mike Selig

    8.21.19

    Reply

    Hi Jeff

    how does the Sony PCM D-10 compare with the Tascam DR100 MK3 sound quality wise?

    Best regards

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