Story Workshop Fall 2017: Pieces

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Intro from Jay Allison: The 13th cohort of our Story Workshop just completed nine weeks of audio storytelling training here in Woods Hole. Their reporting ranged from sneakerheads to synesthesia to hoarding. These new producers now join over 100 Story Workshop alumni working all over the country and the world. Please give a listen to their work, and welcome them to the public media and podcasting universe.

"After The Storm" by Aviva DeKornfeld


Aviva DeKornfeld

I really believe the story lives in the details. I think, especially for this story, where I had limited interview tape and the sisters didn’t speak English, it was particularly important for me as the narrator to swoop in and direct the listener’s attention to help them see what I was seeing.

Read more and listen.

"We Hunt Monsters" by John Hill


John Hill

Basically, if your sole definition of a great story is simply "a story that will blow your audience away," then you're looking for an M&M in an ocean. That's a result and a reaction, not a starting point.

Read more and listen.

"the Feeling Mode" by Rachel Ishikawa

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Rachel Ishikawa

Producing radio means confronting your own assumptions. Realizing a piece — even though it may not be connected to you personally — may put you at odds with your own personal beliefs.

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"Minimum Of Justice" by Sam Kimball

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Sam Kimball

This piece focuses on the working poor, the substance-addicted, and people of color, who are intentionally targeted and punished by our legal system, of which mandatory minimums are one aspect.

Read more and listen.

"A Walk Through Tanglewood" by TK Matunda

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TK Matunda

I’ve learnt through Transom that you can’t plan for everything. The ideas you had before recording are going to change once you listen back to the tape. Your first draft will look nothing like your final piece.

Read more and listen.

"Searching For Shipwrecks" by Alvin Melathe

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Alvin Melathe

The thing that most helped me progress was learning to work through the discrete stages of “I hate my story” which are fairly universal when producing a piece.

Read more and listen.

"The Other Shoe Drops" by Micaela Rodriguez

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Micaela Rodriguez

Sometimes people get really excited about their passion and talk WAY. TOO. FAST. David is one of those people.

Read more and listen.

"Making Her Bed" by Matthew Simonson

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Matthew Simonson

I learned an important lesson in doing this project: stories can fall apart very quickly, and very often do. But that doesn’t mean that the time spent on them was a waste.

Read more and listen.

"It’s All In My Head" by Ilana Weinstein

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Ilana Weinstein

I have scenes, characters, themes, musical cues, and all that other stuff I’m supposed to put in a radio piece, but I lacked that one key element of a story—the actual story part. And yet somehow, I think the piece works.

Read more and listen.

About Rob Rosenthal, Lead Instructor

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Rob Rosenthal

Rob Rosenthal is an independent producer and a teacher. He’s the host for the HowSound podcast on radio storytelling — a joint project of PRX and Transom. He started and then ran the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies’ radio track for 11 years. And, he is now the lead teacher for the Transom Story Workshop, which launched in the fall of 2011.

 

About Leila Day, Teaching Assistant

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Leila Day

Leila Day is an editor and producer from San Francisco. Her work has been on NPR, AARP, USA TODAY, AJ+, and various podcasts; winning local and national awards. She’s a former editor at Al Jazeera’s podcast network and former producer and editor at KALW public radio. Leila’s currently creating a new podcast called The Stoop… stories from the black diaspora that aren’t shared enough. She’s taught various workshops on audio making, and you can find some of her reporting advice on NPR’s Training site.

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