Your Radio Nightlight

Your Radio Nightlight

Intro from Jay Allison: When we first heard Benjamen Walker's work, we were relieved. Someone was bothering to do something on the radio that didn't fit. At all. His hours start cold, without a title, without explanation. They range all over the field, but eventually you realize they huddle around a theme. The work is odd and intriguing - not drama, not talk, not documentary, not music - but drawing on all of it, playing with it. Okay, sure, some of it sounds like Joe Frank, but a lot of it doesn't. It's unfettered by the pinched imagination of public radio. It makes you think about what the medium might be used for... if someone bothered.

We highly recommend that you listen to these excerpts of Ben's work on Transom, and if you're game, go to "Your Radio Nightlight" and listen to whole hours. Better yet, drive around Boston some night, tuned to WZBC and be surprised by one. And, in the years to come, keep an ear out for Ben. He's just getting started.

Produced by Benjamen Walker

Excerpts from “Your Radio Nightlight”

(Notes From Benjamen Walker)

Download
Listen to “Underworld”

These two bits are from the show UNDERWORLD – the show is pretty dark but this whole idea of the underworld being some place “hip” and “cool” drives me nuts!!! There is nothing hip or cool about the underworld – it is an abusive scary sick and twisted place… these two phone calls are the “light humorous” moments of the show…

Download
Listen to “Kierkegaard”

The story about this segment is probably more interesting than the piece itself. I was producing for the WBUR “Connection” – right after Chris Lydon was fired and I missed him terribly. I was planning on doing something on Kierkegaard so I put this talk show “parody” together… But even though it’s a parody – it really is a talk show about Kierkegaard, and that really is Chris Lydon who calls in at the end of the show. I recorded this in the connection studio using the connection staff!!! I got quite a few emails form listeners who were confused about this change in format “it sounded like something you would never do” I hope I hear that more often.

Download
Listen to “Focus Group”

I had a bunch of pieces that I didn’t know what to do with so I brought a couple people into the studio and played the pieces for them as if they were a focus group. One day I hope to do a real one!!! The man on the train is the truly amazing Sean Cole – the woman on the train is Michelene Boudreaux.

Download
Listen to “For Rent, Part Two”

This is a “radio drama” segment – it was a particularly bad year to find an apartment – the realtor is my friend Jon Marston

Download
Listen to “Sacrifice”

This segment is from a show called “a sacrifice” Here in Boston there is this fascist talk show host named Jay Severin (actually though he lives in Sag Harbor – he broadcasts via ISDN from his basement!!) and I really really loathe him – I became obsessed with him – I wanted to kill him!! (scary note: around this time I worked for Chris Lydon when he filled in for Jay and I got to sit at JAY’s DESK!!!!) I made this show about a talk show host named “Ray Leverin” hoping that it would cure my obsession, it did… My friend Peter Choyce does the voice of Ray Leverin.

Download
Listen to “The Greater Depression”

Monologue. I keep meaning to put in some clown noises at the end…

About Your Radio Nightlight

When I was in college the campus radio station, KGLT in Bozeman, Montana aired Joe Frank’s radio program “Work In Progress.” It was a radio show with no format – it was just an uninterrupted series of stories, conversations, radio skits, and monologues. It was the work of total genius. To this day I do not understand: 1. Why Joe Frank is not a more celebrated genius (I mean Ira Glass hasn’t even used him in one of his shows????) and 2. Why no one else has ever made use of the “formatless” radio format.

The worst thing about having a format is being stuck with it – If you aren’t formatted as a talk show then what happens when you want to do a talk show? Or if you are formatted as a talk show what happens when you want to do documentary pieces?? I have watched program directors and senior producers wrestle with these issues first hand and I just don’t get it… when a listener hears something that they’re not expecting THEY LISTEN EVEN MORE INTENTLY!!! Perhaps we can blame it all on the “rule” – the rule says that you are supposed to “tell them what they are going to hear, play the piece, and then tell them what they heard.” BOOOOORRRRRRRIIIIIINNNNNGGGGG.

“Your Radio Nightlight” shamelessly rips off the “formatless format” from Joe Frank but I don’t feel bad about it – it’s really a format that the radio needs more of, especially now that every single NPR affiliate is trying to get a “national two hour call-in talk show” on the air I mean, come on people!!!!!

I give all the shows titles but they are more or less themes, sort of like “This American Life,” but more “exploration” than “documentation.” I am also an obsessive reader and I try to work in what ever I am reading at the time into the shows. That’s why there’s currently Paul Gauguin in the shows…

All the music I use in the broadcasts comes from WZBC. In 1980 the station began playing “no commercial potential” music and I am sure we have one of the best instrumental music libraries in the country. The music is a big part of YRNL.

Benjamen Walker's Studio
Benjamen Walker’s studio in Cambridge, MA

About Benjamen Walker

In 1995 I graduated from college and moved to Boston. I was determined to follow my dream of being a cartoonist. I have always loved cartoons because it is a “cheap” artform – all you really need is some ink, paper and a few pens – It’s also a very accessible medium and a medium that allows for both intimacy and experimentation… sorta like radio!!

The cartooning didn’t pan out. I spent three years living in this unheated basement wallowing in india ink and squalor and drinking heavily with my imaginary friend Barnard the elephant. Oh yeah – and we listened to LOTS and LOTS of radio…

This is a cartoon that I did near the beginning. I had this idea of making like an adult calvin and hobbes story about me and my imaginary elephant… I was certain that it would be huge!!!

The only reason I didn’t blow my brains out during those three dark squalid years was WZBC. The Z (as we call it) is one of those hybrid stations, some college students, some community members. The program schedule is mostly music – but the sort of music that you really really will not hear anywhere else. And late at night – things get even weirder… it seemed like the perfect place to try out “cartoon radio”…

The first show I did was an overnight show, and it was mostly music until I got a mini disc player and figured out how to hook it up to the board – Now I was able to air my own collage bits – things I would record off the street or in the basement of the boston public library.. I also would edit music pieces on the mini disc so that I could talk over them…

Then in April of 2000 I started working for WBUR, the Boston NPR station. Within months I learned everything I ever wanted to know about recording and ProTools!! I also made real life radio friends… and then in August I turned my WZBC show Your Radio Nightlight into a one-hour pre-produced show. I sneak into the studios of WBUR at night and on the weekends to record and I mix and edit the entire show on my G3 that sits on my drawing table. I hope I get to do this forever.


Support for this work provided by the
Open Studio Project

with funding from the
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
and

The National Endowment for the Arts

NEA

Ben Walker

About
Ben Walker

Benjamen Walker has made radio for NPR, WNYC, WFMU, and the BBC. Currently he produces and hosts The Theory of Everything, part of the Radiotopia network from the public radio exchange.

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  • Jay Allison

    1.16.02

    Reply
    Your Radio Nightlight

    Ben’s work gives us a lot to talk about. The blurred lines between documentary and fiction, parody and art. And technical considerations like music beds, dramatic field recording, directed improvisation, the craft of monologue.

    It’s reasonable to discuss the excerpts by themselves, but, really, they weren’t meant to be presented that way. Each is part of a whole and resonates off the other parts, so any critique is a bit unfair. But that shouldn’t stop us! Let’s have at it anyway.

    We tried to pick bits that stand on their own. Maybe we should think about whether the excerpts actually work well on their own; do they need an hour around them? Hey, could they be even shorter? A quick poll of this crowd of radio zealots hanging out at Transom… How often do you listen to an hour of radio, straight through, if you’re not stuck in a car? Do you wish you could listen to more? Would you subscribe to work like this on the Internet or by CD? Have you gone to http://www.yourlight.org to listen to the whole hours?

    Don’t you have a life, a job, two jobs, children?

    Should we in public radio be waging war against the shrinking attention span, the spoon-feeding of news we can use, the death of radio art, the segmentation of content, the drone of information? Should we be digging in and fighting to the last man? Or do we have other stuff to do today?

  • larry massett

    1.16.02

    Reply

    This is so good it almost makes me wish I owned a radio. Or lived in Boston, whichever is cheaper. I want to go listen to the hour shows just as soon as I have to wash dishes or clean my room or something ( you can’t stare at a blank computer screen for an hour.)

    Listening to the excerpts I wanted to quibble here and there with a mix or a read; but thinking of it as a weekly show, why quibble? Heck, Joe Frank used to spend so much time polishing his weekly shows he’d collapse from exhaustion. It’s not worth it. The main thin is this is fun, imaginative, makes me want to hear more.

    Jay asks, hopefully, "Would you subscribe to work like this on the Internet or by CD? " A long time ago ( summer of l823 ), Keith Talbot tried to start a radio magazine to be mailed on monthly cassettes. More recently there’s Salon, which has – I promised them I’d keep this a secret, but what the heck- exactly one paid subscriber. So it’s a good business model, and maybe it could work for Nightlite.

    Benjamin seems to wonder why Joe Frank isn’t invited on This American Life. See, Joe has his own show and Ira has his own show, so it’s sort of like wondering why Dan Rather never fills in for Barbara Walters. But I do wonder why his show from KCRW, with a hard-core cult following , has never been picked up by other stations. Or only a couple. Mystery to me. Has Nightlite tried to move beyond Boston?

    Anyway thanks for the show.

    Larry

  • larry massett

    1.17.02

    Reply
    The Whole Show

    Just went to Benjamin’s website and listened to the complete version of "Underground." I cranked the sound up really loud so I could hear it while a few chores ( re-roofed my house, built a deck, cooked dinner for a hundred guests, and did my income tax for the next ten years.) The hour show is a whole different animal from the excerpts and I like it even more. It’s quite slow-paced, at least the one i heard, and has a spacy late-night feel that grows as it goes along. Highly recommended.

    Larry

  • scott carrier

    1.18.02

    Reply
    Ruff, Ruff

    The Lassie in me wants to go tell Joe. "Lassie, go tell Joe this guy is being funny like him." I got timed out after about three minutes but it was the one where the guy goes to China for a heart transplant, and Benjamin imitates Joe exactly, but still has his own story and it’s fun to listen to. What does this mean?

  • bw

    1.18.02

    Reply
    one paid subscriber!!!

    Larry-

    so many things to ask you I don’t know where to start…

    as regards to how and why shows move beyond their home bases – I’ve learned that program directors NEVER pick up shows becasue they just "like" them… its always a matter of a trade off with another station a bit of you air my show or we won’t air your show .. perhaps I’m stating something that everyone here knows about or maybe I’m pulling back a veil… but its definitely true and with all these shows betting their success on "going national" well… good luck!!

    I love local radio and I would be more than satisfied just being on the radio in a place that I lived…

    I think that this need to "go national" is perhaps public radio’s BIGGEST problem right now… just a thought..

    thank you for your kind words and I am really glad you listened to underworld because I think it addresses a lot of the topics in your fringe essay… I like to listen to aliens too and I know quite a few of them but most of them have really sad stories and serious porblems and when "Mr or Ms public radio" shows up to record them for a "fifteen minute" spotlight.. it seems a bit exploitive.. maybe I’m being to harsh here but I know this guy who has spent his whole life being "tapped" by media producers in the mainstream but he’s never really been able to do anything on his own – and he feels some one should have offered to help rather than record his wacky life for other people’s productions… maybe he should make something for transom…

    anyways.. more soon..

    anyway – but as far as keeping a fringe alive in public radio

  • Angela Wolford

    1.18.02

    Reply
    I need some help

    I am a high school English teacher and am getting ready to start a unit on Oral Traditions. I want to incorporte TAL somehow, and am thinking maybe there’s a show about urban legends, folklore, tall tales? Anyone have any ideas?
    Thanks

  • beedge

    1.18.02

    Reply
    TAL info

    angela, perhaps you’re lookoing for the TAL discusion here at Transom. it’s:
    http://talk.transom.org/WebX?13@@.ee812d8

    but a quiker way to answer your ?’s is to go to:
    http://www.thislife.org/

    and enter "legends" or "folklore" in the search box in left frame.
    or click the "For Educators" link further down on left.
    http://www.thislife.org/pages/educate.html

    we now return this discussion back to an equally fine series: Your Radio Nightlight

  • chelsea merz

    1.18.02

    Reply
    Listen to the Entire Show

    Beware, I could froth endlessly about Benjamen Walker’s radio.

    I just love Ben’s stuff. A Frankophile I was afraid to listen to his work but it’s different. Benjamen has a unique sensibility–I’m not sure what it is but it’s funny and compelling and manic, etc….

    Indeed, you have to listen to Ben’s shows in their entirety in order to appreciate his humor, depth, frivolity, and hysteria. (And to have a remarkable sensory experience; his use of sounds, music, the phone).

    Where to begin? For Rent II, Dorian Harmony, City of God–they are all transcendent –they are all completely different. I particularly like the digressions within each show. There are times when I think ‘Christ–this is indulgent…’ but in the end you can’t hold it against Walker or his work because you can tell how much fun he’s having–his passion for radio and what he’s doing is palpable and that in itself is a great experience as a listener. And a lot of his indulgences pay-off in the end (There’s a monologue in Dorian Harmony that starts to feel oppressive but at the very end he does something to redeem it and in a sense completely change what seemed to be the original intent of that sequence) .

    The other thing I like about this stuff is that it makes me feel so stupid–in a productive way. Much like the Connection during Lydon’s reign–a book, a philosopher,etc… will pop-up in one of Ben’s monologues and I just want to go to the library and find out what this guy is talking about.

    PS:
    (I agree that one of the BIGGEST problems in public radio is the need to go national. so many shows have lost there ethos– or betrayed it– by going national. Having lived in Boston for a long time Walker’s allusions to "the Tin Foil man," the Boston Public Library, MBTA make his shows more meaningful)

  • larry massett

    1.18.02

    Reply
    How Much?

    "it seems a bit exploitive…"

    I live in a small noone-locks-the-door kind of town where nothing ever happens except the odd suicde. Couple years ago a homeless guy took up at the little shopping center. He’d moved up from Washington DC with his cardboard box and his rags and thought he’d found a pretty good spot in front of the 7-11 here. No competition. Folks were excited. Most had never seen an actual homeless man before. People started taking him clothes, extra blankets, cans of food…cookies…home-cooked meals.. pestering him with .sympathy, advice, questions, on and on. The guy split after a week. He just couldn’t take it.

    On the other hand, when people suspect they’re used by media, they sometimes start demanding payment in advance. Then the exploitation runs both ways. Those heart-breaking stories you’re reading now out of Afghanistan, what’s CNN paying for them? Scott Carrier was just over there, maybe he knows. A foreign jouralist once said to me "All journalism is a form of rape." Mind you this was a foreigner, so it probably doesn’t apply to us.

    What Joe Frank used to do when he wanted to tape, you know, a demented junkie hookie, was pay them for their time, then re-work the material for somebody else to read; never used the real voice.

    The question of "going nation" is a tough one too. You doing a local show in Boston exactly the way you want, me being able to hear it over the Net, that’s fine. Only seems like you ought to make something, somehow, off the downloads. In foreign countries (sorry for referring to them twice in one message) writers get a small fee everytime somebody checks one of their books out of the library. I think this is funded by a writers’ union. I think I am over my head now. Can I just send you a couple dollars?

    Larry

  • Chris Lydon

    1.18.02

    Reply
    Our Dostoevsky?

    Okay, I didn’t say Ben Walker is Dostoevsky–yet. But there’s something in that voice on Your Radio Nightlite that connects him to Dostoevsky–even more than to his other idols like Kierkegard and Gaugin. When I listen to Ben’s radio voice, I hear the anonymous narrator of "Notes from Underground" and of Dostoevsky’s incomparable stories–"The Dream of a Ridiculous Man," "White Nights" and "The Gentle Creature." It’s the voice of a nocturnal seeker and searcher, lonely, funny, brave, at liberty in the strangeness of his/our world, cracking jokes, on edge, ranting sweetly about the end of everything, daring God, imagining other worlds. It’s part of the Dostoevsky effect that the pieces start without introduction or explanation. Also that they careen through so many moods–from the self-destructive to the ecstatic. I think Dostoevsky would have envied and admired Ben’s amazing use of music loops. Great stuff.

  • Tom Gilmore

    1.18.02

    Reply
    A Law Unto Himself

    Try telling Benjamen Walker — try suggesting, for that matter — that he should consider doing something this way or that way. Try it and watch him belly roar! Joke’s on you. Why? Because BW is a man guided by his own twisted, sometimes cynical, often outrageous, usually funny, though sometimes sad (sometimes both at once), and ocassionally very accurate vision of the world and the humans in it. As with anyone who is a law unto themselves, there will be times when you just don’t get it. Hey, I love Captain Beefheart and do you think I get it when he sings, "My Head Is My Only House Unless It Rains"? Hell no I don’t get it, but I don’t think I need to. "Getting it" can be beside the point anyway and in a culture that stresses the importance of immediacy, to the degree of excluding most anything that requires a little mental effort, well I’m happy BW is among us and doing his radio show on a regular basis. As far as shows not mentioned so far, I recommend "Other People." Far more interesting — scratch that — ten times more interesting than Terry Gross! Your Radio Nightlight is a labor of love and a testament to the individual listening to the voices within to great effect.

  • cw

    1.21.02

    Reply
    "it’s all good" was a funny critcism of university pomo theory

    reminds you that a sense of humor can sneak in a criticism/total dismissal one might have otherwise have steeled yrself against

  • cw

    1.21.02

    Reply
    i’m trying to decide what the dance music background

    is meant to do. give it an automatic humorous slant/propel the narrative forward?

  • David Greene

    1.23.02

    Reply
    not always horse-trading

    Hey BW,

    I think you’ve gotten a sonewhat skewed idea of why Program Directors decide to air shows. I’ve helped create two national shows, and now work on a third…I was also a Program Director for a few months. From my experience, horse-trading is actually the exception rather than the norm. The Program Directors I’ve dealt with have, for the most part, decided to air shows because they like them, or thought "they would serve their audience." The latter approach opens that whole area of research, and an over-reliance on shows that have already "been successful elsewhere"

  • New BW Fan

    1.24.02

    Reply

    Listening to Benjamin Walker’s stuff was a great experience for me. I am trying to produce my own audio stories, and I have been foolishly locking myself into producing something "TAL-worthy." Benjamin is like the anti-Glass (not that I think he is "against" TAL stuff, but he just comes at this from a very different angle), and hearing his stuff allowed me to give myself permission to be more free form. I am much happier with my results.

  • cw

    1.25.02

    Reply
    other approaches/the idea ofTAL/NPRworthy etc

    I think listening to as many different genres and ungenres of stuff is necessary for what you want to do. music, poetry, bad performance art, birders, films, art bell, people who run their mouths and don’t quit, whatever. limiting yrself to a what you consider to be a certain "form" or forum is a recipe for destruction for a lot of people, esp me.

  • Jay Allison

    1.27.02

    Reply
    next

    Ben, what hour are you working on now? Do you get ideas for the big idea, or do you get small ideas and come up with a big idea to connect them? Do you ever think about working in a form shorter than an hour?

    Now i can’t help but think of you as that man in the Underground performing for shadows, or the drunken clown performing in the darkened window of his apartment for an audience of other darkened windows. Isn’t that radio, after all?

  • bw

    1.28.02

    Reply
    next up…

    Larry-
    keep your money… your kind words suffice… I like to do stuff while I listen to the radio as well.. It’s still freaks me out when people tell me they don’t have time to listen to the radio??? I mean come on – put one in your bathrooom…

    David Greene –
    well.. I would love to be wrong in regards to this issue… but unfounfortunately like I said I have first hand knowledge that this most defidefinitely takes place … it makes me think about how the bad commercial radio stations lost their soul when they went all out to get money from the record industry i.e. no pay no play… lets face it though – for some of these big market public radio stations their airtair time has serious financial value and they just refuse to "give it away" – they want a financial return…
    but like I said – I would love to be wrong about this…
    I just want to be on one station anyway… as I mentioned earlier I think the major problem with public radio is that there is too much national content and not enough local content…

    Jay-
    what’s next?
    well… It’s been difficult to think about radio these days.. so much going on… will the new world order even allow radio??
    I have always hoped to find somewhere to fit myself inside the public radio world but lately I have been leaning towards the idea that perhaps what public radio needs is some competition.. but then again… there is no competition??? I think your public radio exchange model is very very very very hot – how many years from now do you think this model might actually be a way for indepedant producers to get their work out on a regular basis??
    I don’t want to do pieces.. I want to do a show… I think they are two very different things and whereas you can send your pieces out to all kinds of shows where do you send a whole show???

    ps – In regards to some of the other comments I am definitely not anti-tal nor am I russian…

  • Sarah Morrill

    2.03.02

    Reply
    Falls Short

    These aren’t inspired by Joe Frank, they are attempted duplicates.

    There’s nothing wrong with that, but you have to come a lot closer to his quality or the comparison is painful.

    They fall short, and not just a little bit.

    Walker has talent but he needs to find his own voice.

  • Bryn Perkins

    2.05.02

    Reply
    Very Inspiring

    It’s inspiring to hear radio that’s very good but slightly rough and off-center, like these pieces by Ben. The silky-smooth work of David Isay and the best TAL episodes are amazing, but can also be intimidating to a wanna-be radio producer like myself.

    My vote on the question Jay asked earlier: I think these excerpts do much better as part of a larger show, because each piece doesn’t need to balance on its own. They can overextend in some ways and be lacking in others, but the pieces on either side, and the music connecting them, can support the whole.

    For example, a monologue that sounds indulgent on its own can work well, if placed between two interviews in which Ben edited himself out.

    Of course, that’s not to say that these pieces need to stay together with the pieces Ben has put them with, on his own shows. Someone with a good ear for balance and lots of choices could probably put together a really interesting show with a little of this, a little of that, a la The Radio Exchange. But I think one would have to listen carefully.

    I’ve really enjoyed "My Radio Nightlight" — thanks to Ben and Transom for putting his work up here.

  • Susan Jenkins

    2.05.02

    Reply
    this week in Newsweek cartoons

    hey ben, did you see Martha Stewart in the dumpster? She’s bustin’ in on Readymade magazine’s territory…and yours…

    one of my favorites of your programs, although I kept getting the feeling it was about more than finding a place…

    I heard a radio play this weekend on "The Next Big Thing" here in NY, about a guy who pretends he’s Edgar Degas for a day, it reminded me of your piece and v.v. You could expand your apartment hunt piece and deepen it a little I think to make it more engaging. It almost seems like you were writing for the comedic angle. But if you take the story you’re trying to tell a little more seriously, it will still be funny but have more resonance…sort of the difference between a movie that’s funny and a funny movie. From skit to play…

    just some thoughts.

  • bw

    2.06.02

    Reply
    comedy and dumpsters

    good god… martha in the dumpster…

    A friend of mine was just telling me about this old movie (I think the title is Sullivan’s travels???) where the hereo discovers in the end that comedy is for the oppressed…

    If there is ONE goal I have had in everything I have done thus far it is to make good comedy… We all have standards that we hold ouselves up too – and that is mine..

    It’s interesting that we think npr can’t deal with sex… but how does it really deal with comedy…

    just a question..

    and I mean real comedy…

    not freakin car talk…

  • beedge

    5.09.02

    Reply
    catching up on my Transom listening…

    …i’d been advised by several different folk to listen to the full hours of Nitelite. but out here in boonies where i live we have a miserable connection. finally did listen, tho, to several of the hours in full, and the advice was correct. you really have to hear these things in situ. extracting parts does not reveal the flow on which this show depends.

    BenW ain’t no Joe Frank, but he’ll certainly do while Joe ain’t making shows. and BW gets away with some stuff Joe’s only hinted at. his use of real intervus and real subjects mixed into the farce is nothing but sublime. you’re never sure what’s real and what ain’t. this’d be a great format for say, All Things Considered. would really haul in the listeners if, say, a real intervu with Arafat was mixed in w/ a phony Sharon… er, i digress. Nitelite is superb radio. thanks, ben.

  • John Norris

    1.05.04

    Reply
    Rah-Rah-Rah.

    Benjamin does ample justice to freeform tradition (pardon the paradox) established by the great Joe Frank and stations such as ZBC and New Jersey’s venerable WFMU, he’s made Sunday Night the highlight of my goddamn week. The Keirkegaard (sp?) show blew me out of the water, not strict parody, not just highbrow maundering and political diatribe – Nightlight is never always anything but brilliant (and perhaps too short). Thank you, thank you, thank you Ben, for restoring some of my faith in the creative process and bringing a little warmth and life to a medium that seems to be all-to-rapidly suffocating under the wieght of it’s own unrealized potential. You are doing humankind a great-fucking-service. Keep us thinking, that’s all i ask . . .

  • zip

    6.30.07

    Reply
    where are all the radio nitelite archives????!

    i loved his show in boston! my roommates and i would lie on floor matresses and listen to his stories and music. there was an archive page i found once, but it was a long time ago and have not been able to relocate it.

    i love this man! Please send any info or links to my blog!
    http://www.masterbationandthemeaningoflife.blogspot.com

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