The Rescuers

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Intro from Jay Allison: Nine students recently completed the Spring 2013 Transom Story Workshop and they uncovered wonderful local stories. Their work is a real lesson not only in storytelling, but also in story finding. We asked each student to pick one of the pieces they produced during their time here, tell you about how they discovered it, and chronicle their challenges in producing it. They also picked one of the “Sonic IDs” they made, which are good ones. Most of this group had never produced before, so prepare to be inspired by what they accomplished.

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About “The Rescuers”

Week One at Transom we talked about the logistics of interviewing someone, about sitting knee-to-knee with your subjects, getting over sticking the mic in their faces and asking them to switch off or unplug things like the refrigerator or clocks or anything else making problematic background noise… I’m sure that was all great advice, but I never did a single interview in a remotely quiet place, or even a place that ever could be quiet. At the wildlife clinics I visited, there was constant cacophony of chattering and squawking… and that was just the human volunteers. In retrospect, what I wish I’d done was actually get more of that scrum, rather than hoping no one would notice it. I could have used it in more creative ways to give listeners a better feel for the clinic.

Jackie’s Sonic ID

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Listen to “Jackie’s Sonic ID”

I follow several local conservation groups on Facebook, so when one of them reported that right whales were breaching within yards of Sagamore Beach, I figured *someone* in the crowd of tens, possibly 100s of onlookers that must be assembling right then would be sonic worthy. I grabbed my mic and my dog and went to the beach.

There was one guy there.

Lucky for me, he had a lot to say.

It’s amazing how much the human ear can screen out. It was just the two of us, watching the whales frolic in Cape Cod Bay. I miked him well and got lovely ambi of the rolling waves. When I got home, I realized I also got lots and lots and lots of ambi of the helicopter I completely failed to notice on site. That’s one of those things that I guess just takes practice, but I hope you’ll remember, and laugh at, my cautionary tale.

Check out Wild Care Cape Cod’s guide to baby animals you might find.

 

Listen to More Pieces from this Story Workshop Class

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