“Street Fantasy” and “Baby Mama Drama”

Intro from Jay Allison: You’re probably not going to hear these pieces on public radio. Not only are the premises touchy–like considering a job as a prostitute–but the approach is not distanced or polite. It’s connected and sharp-edged. It makes you think about how we talk and what we choose to talk about. Natalie Edwards studied radio at Brooklyn College with Dr. Martin Spinelli and independent producer Ann Heppermann and made these pieces there. Now, she’s working at 1010WINS News Radio.

Note: These pieces deal with mature themes, so be warned.

Download
Listen to “Street Fantasy”
Download
Listen to “Baby Mama Drama”

About “Street Fantasy” and “Baby Mama Drama”

Natalie Edwards also known as Redwine, in one of the studios at Brooklyn College Radio
Natalie Edwards also known as Redwine, in one of the studios at Brooklyn College Radio

Both my pieces, Street Fantasy and Baby Mama Drama have affected me very personally. With Street Fantasy, this piece was supposed to be a documentary about prostitution, but I decided to put myself into the piece to make it more interesting and reflect on a few things I had been worried about, like what my life would be like after college.

I used to host a party called Nasty Tuesdays at a club in Brooklyn. I don’t know if it was the name of the party or the location, but there were a lot of prostitutes and pimps that attended the party every Tuesday. They would come all dressed up in the finest clothing and accessories. Then there was me who was a full-time student and trying to make extra cash as a part-time host and promoter for Nasty Tuesdays.

I would always see the “special girls” have the most fun at Nasty Tuesdays. They were the ones with the expensive and fancy outfits, buying the champagne, and leaving the club in limos or driving home in luxury cars. They all stood out, because of the money they made. It made me think about doing what they do. I mean, it is fast money and how hard would I really have to work doing something I like? So I did some research and what I found out made the decision for me.  Street Fantasy is all about that decision.

Baby Mama Drama is also a personal story for me. It was something I went through with an ex-boyfriend of mine. He had a child from a previous relationship and it seemed like the mother of his child did not get the memo that it was over between the two of them. She would always call my phone and harass me saying crazy things like the relationship between them was not over and how I messed up their lives. She would cause unnecessary drama in my relationship. I wanted out. I had to get out of this Baby Mama Drama fast. I promised myself that I would never date a guy in that situation again. While I was doing this piece, I asked my ex if I could interview him and the mother of his child. He said it wouldn’t be a good idea. So I created a “drama” out of the real Baby Mama Drama that happened.  So I guess this piece is really, “Baby Mama Drama Drama.”

Tech Notes

All of the equipment I used to record these pieces was from kits checked out of Brooklyn College’s Television and Radio Department equipment facility. According to “Radio MD Recorder #2” kit, I used a Sony MD Walkman MZ-NHF800 mini disc recorder.  The microphone was an Audiotechnica Omnidirectional ATM10a condenser. I edited “Street Fantasy” on SawPro, which was the digital editing system in the school’s radio lab.  (The radio lab recently switched over to Pro Tools.)  However, I edited Baby Mama Drama at the radio station, where we use Adobe Audition.

Natalie Edwards

About
Natalie Edwards

I was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York.  Both my parents are Jamaican. I became involved in radio the first semester I attended Brooklyn College. It was an intro to media class that made me interested in getting involved in doing radio. I started out just being a member of the radio station at Brooklyn College (BCR).  Then I became the Treasurer and Business Manager of Brooklyn College Radio. I had my own show on BCR called "Getting Tipsy with Red Wine." "Street Fantasy" was produced for my intro to audio production class. "Baby Mama Drama" was produced along with Transom while I was working at Brooklyn College Radio.  Throughout college, I interned at several music radio stations throughout New York City doing promotions and a little bit of programming.  I recently graduated in June 2006 with my B.A. in Television and Radio. I was fortunate that within a week after graduation, I was offered a job with the commercial news station 1010WINS where I am a News Production Assistant.  I love it!  I get to work in a newsroom and with the most exciting people. I have the chance to shadow some legendary reporters and see how they report the news. My favorite reporter is Stan Brooks. He is the oldest reporter at 1010WINS (in his late 70's).  He amazes me on how can still get the job done with ease. Riding the whole college thing out really did work for me. I would like to continue to do documentary work as well as work in a newsroom.  One day, hopefully, I would like to have my own show at either a public radio or commercial radio station.  Money is still an issue, but it's not going to stop me from doing radio.

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  • Jay Allison

    11.06.06

    Reply
    "Street Fantasy" and "Baby Mama Drama" – Natalie Edwards

    You’re probably not going to hear these pieces on public radio. Not only are the premises touchy–like considering a job as a prostitute–but the approach is not distanced or polite. It’s connected and sharp-edged. It makes you think about how we talk and what we choose to talk about. Natalie Edwards studied radio at Brooklyn College with Dr. Martin Spinelli and independent producer Ann Heppermann and made these pieces there. Now, she’s working at 1010WINS News Radio.

  • Elizabeth Chur

    11.21.06

    Reply
    Sex, Lies, and Audiotape

    Dear Natalie,

    Thanks for these pieces– they are thought-provoking, and also made me smile a few times. I think you have a really strong sense of "voice"– both what you say, and the way you say it. Your personality, thoughts, and tone really come through in a few short minutes.

    In "Baby Mama Drama," I was wondering about the voices of the other two stories– your boyfriend and his ex. You mentioned in your essay that they weren’t up for being interviewed– so are these actors’ voices, or just what you were able to record of them? Are there things you could say in the piece that you hadn’t been able to say to them directly?

    In "Street Fantasy," did you have to approach a lot of sex workers before you found ones willing to talk to you? How long were your interviews? Do you think there were things they weren’t saying because of the public setting? I was wondering if there was a performative aspect to their interviews that was an extension of their primary job description– or if this was really how they felt about their jobs. (Of course, that could be an interesting question about most interviews– how much are people revealing, and how much are they playing a role?)

    You also mentioned in your essay that you’re working at a news station. How would you compare your "voice" in news stories compared to these ones? Do you feel like it’s really you narrating the news stories (maybe a bit toned down from here), or does it feel like an entirely different persona altogether? Have you had editors try to alter the way you sound? Are there things you’ve learned from doing these pieces that have helped you in your news life?

    Congratulations on this– and on graduating and getting a job!

  • Viki Merrick

    11.26.06

    Reply
    stretching

    I’m wondering how you feel about the limitations or lack of room you have in news to tell a story vs the inventiveness you call on to tell these stories. They’re still real even though unconventional – tell us some stories you had to cover in news that you fantasized doing YOUR way – how would it change? hearing a reporters’ inner voice – you think that might make the listener feel that the information they’re hearing is more honest or less reliable?

  • seancole

    11.27.06

    Reply
    Natalie Rocks!

    Hey Natalie,

    I don’t know if you’ll remember but I met you at Brooklyn College when I was there to do a presentation. I told you then, and I want to tell you again in front of everyone, "Street Fantasy" is freaking fantastic. It blows my mind — for a few reasons:

    1) I don’t very many, if any, reporters who can get access like you did. Speaking to a prostitute? Difficult enough. Speaking to a "John" about a specific prostitute? Never heard that before. And I don’t think I’m likely to on public radio anytime soon. And yet, if our mandate is to present our listeners with voices they’ve never heard before… you did that times a thousand. That’s some crazy-great access you got.

    2) The back-ID of your expert (I can’t remember if I said this to you at the time but I totally said it to the class I spoke to). Almost every public radio piece has some moment where we hear voice out of the blue and the reporter says "That’s so and so of such and such and they say this and that" and back to the tape. Your completely turning that around and directly addressing the woman tape with "Who are you?" and then having her identify herself (followed by "what do you know about prostitution?") is a stroke of genius. Again, never heard anything like that on the radio. And I should. All of us should be taking a lesson from that one moment in your story if nothing else. I’m going to have to fight very hard not to steal that from you.

    3) Your elegant structure and the arc of your story. From the "theme music" that only plays when you’re speaking to transparently presenting questions and then transparently finding people to answer them for you… I’d say it’s uncommon to find a story that’s that well-focused. And I love how you come around at the end and decide — based on all of your reporting — that it’s not for you. And of course listeners probably won’t think you’re ACTUALLY considering prostitution. But the fact that you say it’s not for you at the end is, in my opinion, very gratifying.

    So, in short, you rock! Please, PLEASE, make more pieces like this!

    Oh, and my question… how much public radio had you listened to before you made that piece? I ask because of your using some of the same devices but, again, turning them upside down. So I wondered if you were influenced by public radio pieces you’d heard or if you just came up with all of that stuff on your own (which would make you an UBER-genius!)

    Take care…

  • Transom T-shirt Fairy

    11.28.06

    Reply
    Voice

    Natalie –

    My questions also have to do with voice.

    Maybe it’s because I just attended the Third Coast and Nieman conferences. Maybe it’s because Mark Kramer’s guest manifesto is all about. Most likely though, it it’s because your imprint – your voice – is all over these pieces.

    My questions:

    * Was there any point while making these when you felt you had to compromise your voice? Where and why? Was it your own choice? Editor’s choice? For it for the sake of style or the sake of the story?

    * Echoing Sean’s question – whose work are you inspired by? And what about their work inspires you?

    Last, thanks. By putting yourself out there, you let us in. That’s not easy do.

    — Sam

  • Jay Allison

    11.28.06

    Reply
    t-shirt fairy

    I see Sam posted in her guise as the Transom T-Shirt Fairy.

    I vote a t-shirt for Sean Cole for his insight embedded in compliments.

  • Glenda May

    11.29.06

    Reply
    I was curious too!

    Hi Natalie
    congrats on an excellent radio piece. I was wondering about becoming a prostitute myself, in fact I tried for a night, you can read about it on http://www.indecentproposals.uk.com
    as you willl see, we are looking for other women’s stories so please contribute if you want!
    Glenda May
    London UK

  • natredwine

    11.29.06

    Reply
    SEX LIES AND AUDIOTAPE

    First I would like to apologize for the delayed reply. In the Baby Mama Drama piece, the phone scene was played by an actress and the father scene was played by a friend of mine. There were alot that wasn’t covered in that topic like petty fights and competition for the boyfriend/father. There were alot of things I would like to say to them both, but the father heard this piece and now knows why we are not together anymore. So I would say my my piece said it all.
    I did approach a few, but everyone got really scared because of the microphone. I actually had to chase Midnight in the bathroom. My interviews with each person was up to at least 10-15 minutes long. Midnight’s interview was the longest. I felt she was lying in some of the answers she gave me like her age.
    The John that I interviewed was a bit obnoxious. The police officer I interviewed knew most of them that were in the club.
    As for the news station where I work, I don’t think my voice will work with the other news reporters and anchors at my job, but voice over in commercials would fit me best. Producing these two pieces has helped me alot in my career. Everything has to be on point and accurate at a fast pace. I learned that from editing my pieces.
    Thank you for listening and the compliments

  • natredwine

    11.29.06

    Reply
    I was curious too

    First I would like to apologize for the delayed reply. Thank you so much for listening and I will check out that site.
    Natalie

  • natredwine

    11.29.06

    Reply
    I ROCK!

    Hey I remember you!,
    First I want to say sorry for the delayed reply. Second thank you so much for loving my piece the way you do. I would like to say it was easy for me to get all these interviews, but it took a period of two weeks to get all. I chose the theme music,because of how popular the song was when I was doing my piece. I wanted grab every one’s attention. If you knew the content of the song, you would know why I chose it. The part when I was talking to the counselor and asked who she was, that part reminded me of my older sister. Everytime I would want to do something she would always intervene and rain on my parade. Most of the time, it was for the best. You don’t have to steal it from me, just pay me. LOL! Just kidding!

  • natredwine

    11.29.06

    Reply
    Voice

    First I would like to apologize for the delayed reply. My voice… well, I did have to compromise with myself on how to be sexy. The part when I talk about foreplay, I wanted to sound really sexy. The part when I decided not to prostitute, I wanted to sound like I was disappointed but satisfied with the decision I made. I also wanted to sound like I have an attitude like I know what I am talking about. Through out the whole piece, it was my choice to change my voice to different moods for the sake of story.
    Well the only person I can say I was inspired by was a piece I heard in two classes that I was taking, while I was attending Brooklyn College was a graduate student who I see, his piece is on Transom too, is Miguel Macias. There was a certain part of his piece that I admired when he spoke about love was when he described the love making scene without even mentioning to the audience that the scene was about love making.
    I said to myself, if he can do something like this, so can I. I just didn’t think it would take me this far.

  • Jake Warga

    12.03.06

    Reply
    Wow, thanks.

    Great stories! They’re too good to be heard on NPR, because there are no bodily functions on public radio. BUT THEY SHOULD BE. I really like "street fantasy", how it told what’s going on in such a creative way. How you handled tape was amaizing, cradling it with the strength, sas, and affection of a loving, but no-nonsense mother. And the beat-bed of music was great, I don’t think any of the active radio producers could really get away with that (well, except Sean Cole).

    Keep at it, you’ve found a perfect medium to share what you want to say. I know, because you say it so well. I hear your voice best on "fantasy" because it’s you, versus a slight difference with "baby" when you’re maybe acting more. Tell me some more pieces with tape of people close to you, I await the magic. For some apprentices, a mic is a wand because they are magicians, keep waving it.

  • Sue Mell

    12.05.06

    Reply
    Street Fantasy

    Hey Natalie.

    I guess what I find most fascinating about this piece is the line it hovers at. You say right off that it’s a fantasy but I can vividly recall adolescent conversations from my own life that bordered on the same exponential "logic" of your consideration of the life as a possible choice.

    I remember in particular a high school friend that naively tried working at a massage parlor–"it’s just a back rub, right?"– in Times Square with some frightening results. I like the way "Street Fantasy" underscores the potential for that kind of naivete and vulnerability in young women in such an unusual and, as Elizabeth said, thought provoking way.

    Your piece makes me, as the listener, really think about thinking about it (if you will). My first reaction to the piece was to describe it as "disturbing in the best possible way"–because you talk with people in the life, again, I’m forced to think about someone actually making this choice and what that might mean. Striking and unique–congrats. And yeah, the music, very cool.

    You say in the bio that originally this piece was intended as a documentary–could you talk a little more about how you originally envisioned it and what influenced your choice of telling it dramatically in/as your own voice/experience instead?

  • Tatiana Harrison

    12.07.06

    Reply
    Active Radio

    Hello, there, Natalie
    This is Tatiana Harrison, an adult producer of a youth radio show on KRCB – we were on Transom a while back.

    I’ve been wanted to hear your stories for a good month or so now and finally got enough time free (it’s Wednesday night at the office at about midnight!)

    The important contribution to the evolution of the radio documentary (not to be too grand about it!) with your pieces, for me, is the ACTIVENESS of them. I think some other people have touched on this in the Show Talk…

    But, wow, the idea of using the radio story to actually solve a problem or answer a question – wow. That has got to be explored further and further.

    Not only does the story have this inner dialogue element that keeps things flowing with a sense of real urgency, without feeling faked, but I think it keeps the documentary form from being something only for people who have enough time or peace of mind to just observe and analyze the world from a detached perspective.

    A lot of our kids, whether they are deciding about gang affiliations or reeling from a friend’s suicide or facing the consequences of getting big into graffiti, have very urgent issues in their life and the conventional documentary format doesn’t ring true, the whole tone just doesn’t fit.

    They need their problems solved yesterday, I feel, and it’s hard to find a style for them to get inspired by that fits this aspect of their reality. I am indeed very excited to play your stories as a suggestion for them to model their stories from.

    One of our show hosts, Laquoia, is going to be delving into the world of prostitution for one of her stories coming up and I was wondering if you wouldn be willing to share your experiences with her to get her thinking its possible and support her along the way.

    I hope you guys can get in touch.

    What an honor to be on the Transom, hunh?!

    You must be stoked, as the kids out here in Cali say. We were!

    And, so, while we might still not be playing a lot of Biggie out this way, there’s a lot of respect for what you are doing over there in Brooklyn and I personally hope we can be in touch in the future…

    Tatiana

  • Charles A. Sessoms

    12.10.06

    Reply
    street fantasy

    This piece raises alot of questions about prostitution that are often left unsaid when the issue comes up. I was especially impressed by the section that addressed the connection between how we often view relationships and marriage and the relationship of those views to sexual prostitution.

    I hope you continue this exploration. I think there is a lot more that can be unearthed by a closer look at sex work and its place in our society.

  • natredwine

    12.13.06

    Reply
    WOW, THAMKS

    WOW! I love the compliment. Thank you, I am glad you enjoyed listening to it. Although it is too risky for NPR I’m working on it.
    Natalie

  • natredwine

    12.13.06

    Reply
    street fantasy

    Thank you for seeing it my way. I would love to do more sex pieces and let people realize there is nothing wrong with talking about it. It is natural as the air we breathe
    Natalie

  • natredwine

    12.13.06

    Reply
    Street fantasy
  • natredwine

    12.13.06

    Reply
    Street fantasy

    The way I envisioned this piece was to do a documentary about it. The good, bad and ugly on prostitution. I also wanted to make it very interesting and funny. I like to make people laugh. One day that changed my life forever, was when my advisor Ann Hepperman walked in the classroom where I was working on a script for my piece, came and sat down to talk to me about what I wanted to do in life. I made a joke and said drop out of school and become a prostitute. She was shocked. I told her I’m tired of school and I don’t know when I will graduate so that’s what I want to do. She got red in the face and asked if that was the reason I am doing a piece on prostitution. That’s when I got the idea to use this piece as job research for prostitution.

  • jimiizrael@gmail.com

    12.15.06

    Reply
    BET Uncut for public radio

    Well, it’s been awhile since I’ve been to Transom.com. In the interim, I’ve been doing this, that and a third: NPR, print, working on a book, what have you. I just check in here to make sure the hipsters don’t have any revolts afoot and are still where I left them: hopelessly navel-gazing. CHECK.

    And then I stumble on Nat’s joint.

    Well, let me say this off-rip: these are both exciting peices. The POV is fresh. This, at the top, with some editing, these could easily find a place on the radio. While dude talking about how ole girl takes it in the butt like a champ would probably have to come out (women that listen to NPR,apparently, don’t do anal), NPR loves to hear black people talk about sex, as it’s titilating and enteraining. A young black girl with an accent talking about considering a life a prostitution?! Holy crap, where couldn’t you get on the radio with that? That’s hipster jerk-off material–like BET Uncut, for public radio. Now that I look at that sentence, I guess I can understand why that wouldn’t find a place on, say, All Thing Considered or This American Life.I mean, I couldn’t call Al Sharpton a "duplicitous douchebag" on NPR, and a douchebag is a medical apparatus. Go figure. It’s very sterile and white on NPR, mostly. And that’s a shame. Sadly, I can say from my personal dealings with NPR that public radio is only ready to deal with stories about and by people of color that fall into specific colonial stereotypes.

    However, these joints–especiall the first one– fall nicely into the "Saphire" category that the mainstream loves to hate and/or canonize. The mainstream loves Coon Tales, and they love them most when they are re-told by Coons, so as to absolve them of any (white) guilt. For good or ill–no disrepect, Nat–these definitely qualify as Coon Tales. But all things in, I have to say that this is good radio, if for all the wrong reasons. Because me, myself? I could probably live a long time and not hear another (black) woman talk about considering prositution as a career choice or the "baby-mama drama" she encounters in the dating pool. A long time,because even in my circle of high-falootant doctors,lawyers and politicians, I hear variations on these tales everyday. But white folks love to hear that stuff, because they don’t. They have the same kind of drama, but tragedy’s never as entertaining when it’s happening to you.

    I’d love to hear Nat’s joints on a Black NPR program, and I think I’m going to forward them along to some of my peeps who got it poppin’ like that. Real talk. But more than anything, I guess, I’m just happy to stop in and find out that black people are telling black stories. Progress, in small steps, I guess.

    Happy Holiday.
    ‘Hey’ to Gomer.

    jimi izrael
    http://www.jimiizrael.com

  • Jay Allison

    2.01.07

    Reply
    Street Fantasy on ATC tonight

    I just saw Jimi Izrael’s post… must have missed it before. Good to have you back and hear your unvarnished, nuanced critiques and praise for Natalie. If you ever have radio work that won’t quite fit on NPR, remember that we’d be interested to know about it at Transom.

    So, Natalie’s piece Street Fantasy–a shortened version per the notes above–is airing tonight on NPR’s All Things Considered. Producer Art Silverman found it here and worked with Natalie on the edit. I’m glad Natalie is getting a crack at this audience and it’s good to know pieces like this can circulate more widely, all cultural complexities duly noted.

  • Steve Mencher

    2.03.07

    Reply
    ATC version vs. "original" of Street Fantasy story

    For me – the NPR version is more of a well told tale – I think the benefit of working with an editor is in encouraging Natalie to come up with the details, like what Midnight looks like, and encouraging her toward better journalism, like telling us that the voice of authority and reality at the end of the piece is a friend’s mom, as well as a health professional.

    What’s missing in the NPR version is two things – or really the same thing. The sense of outrageous danger, and willingness to explore the forbidden (all the funny/icky anal sex stuff). And a sense that it really could go either way.

    In the "Transom" version, you don’t know from the beginning exactly how it’s going to come out (Will Natalie decide that this is a career worth pursuing?) That makes me a bit queasy, but keeps me listening.

    The NPR story, as we instinctively know, can only come out one way – and they even punch up the happy ending, with Natalie getting a "real" job, although Robert is willing to joke about the relative merits of prostitution and journalism in the intro.

    My bottom line – yes, the NPR version is "tuned" to its audience. It links on the web to the original, so any listener can compare versions. Something is gained, something is lost. But I don’t think Natalie’s voice is lost or compromised in any way.

    my 2 cents –

    steve mencher

  • AnnHeppermann

    2.08.07

    Reply
    Comments from Brooklyn College student, Spadaque Volcimus

    There was uproar a few weeks ago over Delaware democratic senator Joseph Bidens comments regarding Senator Barack Obama. In a news interview he described Obama as “articulate” and “clean.” He later defended himself by saying he was only trying to compliment the African-American Senator. You’re probably wondering what this has to do with Natalie Edwards’ edited radio piece, “Street Fantasy”, that aired on National Public Radio’s (NPR) All Things Considered. Well, in Bidens comments we see the sort of thinking that resulted in the producers of All Things Considered taking Natalie’s original piece and making it “articulate and clean” for a national audience. This can only be described as a of post civil rights, post affirmative action stress disorder.

    Having compared Natalie’s original unedited piece with the NPR version it’s almost as if they were made by two different women. The original came off playful and flirty while the edit was reserved and a bit stale. While the piece that eventually ended up on NPR was better produced and more professional, what they sacrificed to appeal to a national audience zapped it of its most interesting sonic elements. It can be assumed that those things missing from the broadcast version – Hip-hop music, spicy sexual language, and fantasy role-play- are things that aren’t of interest to a national audience. But who decides what the audience is ready for? What is the relationship between programmer and listener? And what responsibility, if any, do they have to each other?

    In media, making something for a mass audience requires that the product be boiled down to easily digestible stereotypes. There’s no room for complexity in character. There’s no way a black girl from Brooklyn can contemplate prostitution in a way that’s engrossing and entertaining. However, there are two solutions to this problem. First, the old way of doing things needs to change. Instead of waiting for the audience to be ready give them something new, now. Second, take the mass out of mass audience. The idea of appealing to a common denominator is out dated and it robs the content creators of artistic breathing space.

  • Tiffany Patterson

    2.12.07

    Reply
    Original is Natural

    I’m going to make this short and sweet. I understand the reason for revision but do agree that much too much was changed to make the piece "appropriate" for a national audience. Many things that contributed to the essence and soul of the original message were compromised in the final edit such as the background instrumental tracks as well as the "out-of-the-box" commentary by Miss Natalie Edwards. In my opinion, these were all vital things empowering the documentary as a whole and helping to identify it’s environment.

    -Tiffany L. Patterson

  • jimiizrael@gmail.com

    3.07.07

    Reply
    unvnarnished, nuanced critique

    By "unvarnished, nuanced critique", I think Jay means "unedited and/or spell-checked ruminations from the street".

    Well, I checked out the NPR version finally, and it was uglier than I thought it would be. It sounded EXACTLY like Fetish Radio: bad This American Life-ish long-stick anthropology. If my daughter did a segment for NPR and the producer called it "America’s Next Prostitute?" That producer would need dental attention, hipster-doofus irony be damned. Reminds me of the time I did a joint for the Chicago Trib and the header was "A Poor Black Child Reflects on Mr. Rogers". T’was the last by-line of mine they carried.

    NPR often cannot resist the urge to look at subjects of color from a colonial perspective, and end up casting the subjects into familiar colonial stereotypes, almost by accident (see also, "This American Life). This is ugly radio at its worst.

    Technically, her delivery was rushed and nervous. Nice smile on her, just slow down. The attitude was too sassy and unnatural-sounding. I prefer the original, as it didn’t sound designed to give me a cheap radio chubby. The ATC version, between the title and the peice itself, sounds like soft radio porn. I think somewhere like News and Notes would have dealt Edwards a better directorial hand, and a better title.

    What parent wants to link to a peice by thier daughter entitled "The Next American Prostitute"? The whole subject is ugly, and mis-handled here in a variety of ways. But the ATC joint sucks donkey nutts. Nat took an "L", as they say on the streets. "L", as in a "loss". (I generally won’t be your Negro Tour Guide to African-American Vernacular English (aka "Ebonics). So don’t ask again.)

    I’m on a quest to get the word "douchebag" on NPR before the end off the year. So, I’m off to that lofty task, trying to change the face of public radio…heh heh

    peeeeeeece

    jimi

  • Tracye Miles

    3.19.07

    Reply
    Hey, we liked it

    My husband just called me into his home office to listen to these two pieces. We both thought they were interesting, intriguing and for lack a better word cute! Though it’s not our personal expression or experience, we can definitely appreciate it as a valid experience and expression of another. It is called public radio after all…not just MY public radio. If this is a career start, with growth and development, she should have a good future. From Chicago to New York…Go New York!!!

  • a

    2.05.08

    Reply
    Great Very Infofmative

    I shared the Baby Mama Drama clip with my boyfriend, and I listened to the Street Fantasy clip by myself. Both of those issues I deal with him about. A year apart and now he has a baby’s mama. This helped him understand where I was coming from and why I was uncomfortable with trying to make any lasting commitments. He claims that the baby’s mama will not get in the way, she knows we’re back together, and they’re just friends. We’ll see.

    I am not a prostitute, but he has been in the ring purchasing off the street. I don’t know why or even how far he even went, but it’s been years. That’s what broke us up when he finally told me about it. I am trying to have faith that he won’t go back and do it again.

    Thanks, at least I know it’s not just me. I’ll keep you posted how things go.

  • Knique

    5.08.08

    Reply
    Baby Mama Drama

    I can’t believe what I heard I am going through the same thing right now. I am the girlfriend and he spends all his time over there. Sleeping over and everything. My boyfriend told me that his baby mama and his son were a family. I thought I was just being jealous, but after hearing this it made me happy that someone else had went through and had the same feelings I did. Now I can break up with him and won’t feel bad. Thank you!

  • fmlyons

    7.06.08

    Reply
    i’m a babys’ mama

    WHen I heard the girlfriends side i could understand how she felt. this was a great example of "two sides to every story" because when i heard the father’s side he was more compelling. Sometimes as mother’s we give the guys a hard time because we want to do the best for our children. I am the mother of two men children. And I have two different situations. Without boring you with the details i’ll just say (again) the father in this piece was right and his feelings were well founded.
    FM in Los Angeles

  • fmlyons

    7.06.08

    Reply
    Good Money

    I guess this is a right of passage for black girls from the inner city who go to college but don’t know who things are gonna pan out. (sounds like a book title). Anyway…It happened to me when I was a hot young college student. There was a girl who was already set up at an escort agency in NY for a few years and she had began stealing their clients and setting up her own thing. I was the token hot black chick. I made 350 a hour. no cut. no danger. lots of drugs, which was a perk back then. Twenty years later i know that GOD had his hand on my life. I was blessed to have lived through it and i don’t recommend any woman to sell her body for anything. EVER.NEVER EVER!
    FM in Los Angeles

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