Radio Rookies

Radio Rookied

Intro from Jay Allison: The Radio Rookies are not what you're used to hearing on public radio. That's one reason we're featuring them on Transom. We'd like to hear more. Another reason is to urge you to engage the Rookies in conversation. They'll be dropping by the discussion boards to see what you have to say about their work, the way they used the radio, how they told their stories. Ask them questions. The stories are all pretty short, and they're worth your time.

Linda | Judith | Macho | Karla | Nesse

The Rookies


Linda Cuevas

Linda
Linda

My story is on something that happened to me when I was 14 years old. I tried to commit suicide and I landed in a mental institution. I share my story about what it was like and why I did it. I interview my mom, the doctor who counseled me at the time, my friend from the institution, and I talk about how I’ve changed since then.

Linda’s mentor is Subrata De.

Download
Listen to “Depression”


Judith Rudge

Judith
Judith

Since she moved to the Bronx from Suriname at age 12, Judith hasn’t felt she fits in with any group. Dutch is her first language. She wants to be an opera singer. She’s black. In Junior High, her peers wondered why she couldn’t sing like ‘Monica.’ In High School, she remembers a girl from an African-American club telling her, “Dutch is not a Black language.” She did not take up arms, as some outcasts have — instead she took up poetry.

Judith’s mentor is Jessie Graham.

Download
Listen to “Poetry”


Rafael “Macho” Lopez

Macho
Macho

A year and a half ago, I dropped out of school. The teachers didn’t have enough books to give us, there were too many kids in classes, and some teachers gave me a hard time. Sometimes we’d come out fighting, so to avoid that situation, I left school. I DID get something out of it — knowledge. In my story, I investigate my own reasons for dropping out, talk to other students who’ve dropped out, interview the principal at the school I was at, and record myself and my tutor at Make The Road By Walking. I also talk about my plans for the future.

Macho’s mentor is Kerry Donahue

Download
Listen to “Dropping Out”


Karla Saavedra

Karla
Karla

I am from Mexico and I know little English. It is difficult for me and for other new immigrants to learn English. My story is about my adventures as a Spanish speaker in New York. I interview my principal, my English teacher, my friends and my mom. I also show you how I try to improve my English by listening to music and singing along.

Karla’s mentor is Matt Abramovitz

Download
Listen to “English”


Janesse Nieves, aka Nesse

Nesse
Nesse

Janesse says she and her mother have one thing in common — they were both betrayed by Janesse’s father. He left them for Heroin when she was only a school girl. Janesse takes her microphone to her father’s house to try to convince him he should leave Heroin alone. But she can’t convice him to stop. A clinical expert tells her there’s nothing she can do, but she finds that hard to believe.

Janesse’s mentor is Beth Fertig

Download
Listen to “Heroin”

About Radio Rookies

Radio Rookies is a WNYC program that trains young people to use words and sounds to tell true stories about themselves, their communities and the world. Through a series of workshops, each held in a new neighborhood, Radio Rookies gives teenagers the tools to become radio journalists. More about Radio Rookies.

Radio Rookies is currently made possible by a generous grant from the Youth Initiatives Program of the Open Society Institute and is run by WNYC Radio in New York.

“Working with the Rookies is inspiring. While sometimes they fear their first interviews with strangers, they often take risks without a second thought. The Radio Rookies are thoughtful, funny, honest and open. They reveal to us and listeners intimate details about their lives and they really let all of us know them through their stories, even at the cost of embarrassment.

When their stories are done, they start to realize how limitless their potential is. Seeing their talent find an outlet and hearing them develop their ideas as they see the power of their voices is rewarding and truly a breath of fresh air.”

Czerina Patel
Program Coordinator

Czerina Patel

About
Czerina Patel

Czerina Patel is the producer of WNYC's award-winning Radio Rookies, considered a model for youth media initiatives nationwide. She has been involved with the program since its inception and through Radio Rookies, has mentored and nurtured dozens of teens from all over New York City. Besides radio and youth, Czerina β€”a native South Africanβ€” loves travel and photography. In addition to running Radio Rookies, teaching the workshops, and producing the stories, she is available to the students at all times.

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  • Jay Allison

    11.12.01

    Reply
    The Radio Rookies

    "Sometimes the hardest part is getting them to believe in themselves, to know that they are capable of great achievements, of great radio… these teens surprise us, challenge us and teach us in so many ways.”
    Czerina Patel, Associate Producer, Radio Rookies

    As public radio has matured, it has repudiated its youthful beginnings. Of course, it does so at its peril. If you let yourself get old alone, you die alone.

    But, there is something different happening in public radio lately. Younger people seem to be interested in it, despite the fact that public radio has not been terribly interested in them.

    I don’t mean just the lively hip nerdly crowd inspired by This American Life, god bless them all, but people even younger. Youth Radio in Berkeley, Blunt Radio in Maine, Radio Arte in Chicago, and the Radio Rookies in New York. Since September 11th, public stations are getting more younger listeners, driven to overcome their initial boredom with the sound. At the recent radio festivals in Chicago, the median age of participants was dramatically lower, at least on a visual scan. How refreshing.

    In the coming months on Transom.org we’re going to be featuring some of these groups and their mentors. We hope our attention to their work and our conversation together will encourage us all to be more open, more inclusive, more interested in making public radio live up to its promise and welcome the future.

    For now, welcome Linda, Judith, Macho, Karla, Janesse, and their mentors Subrata, Jessie, Kerry, Matt, Beth, and producers Marianne and Czerina.

  • Macho Lopez

    11.12.01

    Reply
    My story on dropping out of school

    What up? This is Macho. At first I thought doing a story was going to be hard. Then I started getting interviews and the interviews just got me more motivated and more interested in doing my story. I ain’t think people was going to like it. It was a little hard trying to put the story together taking piece by piece and putting it into the computer. And the day I came to WNYC and they had me on radio (I was interviewed on a show) I was a little nervous. But when everything was together I thought it was pretty good. I couldn’t even tell it was edited. And I hope most of you all like it. Get back to me and tell me what you think.

  • Anne Donohue

    11.13.01

    Reply
    Linda Cuevo

    I just want to applaud Linda on telling her story so well, but more importantly on learning how to cope with loss and move on with her life. I think this piece should be sent to the Samaritans suicide prevention program. I think Linda’s advice in her last paragraph is worth months of therapy and medication for others dealing with depression and contemplating suicide. Thank you Linda!

  • Joshua Barlow

    11.13.01

    Reply
    Macho

    This is a really great piece. Not too many people can lend their lives to such honest examination. A lot of reports I hear tend to bend to one angle or another. Yours seems to bring out not only the frustration you had for the situation you were in and trying to find a way out, but also a good glimpse at what people like the principal are faced with. Stories like these seem to carry more impact when they are told first person. Government reports, and statistics can really only tell a small fraction of the story

    It sounded to me, by the end of your report, that you had made some sort of decision that nomatter what happens in the short term, you were going to do something with your life – travel, continue to learn, live a life. I hope this continues to be true. It sounds like you’ve got a lot of raw talent and insight to help you along.

  • Joshua Barlow

    11.13.01

    Reply
    One other note…

    I knew I was forgetting something. The time on your piece seemed a lot shorter than it actually was, which is good. But it also made me think that with the kind of rhythm you have and the way you transition between sections, you could probably make a much longer story and spend more time in each of the areas you are trying to cover. It works quite well at 8 minutes, but have you ever thought about going back and stretching it out?

  • karla saavedra

    11.13.01

    Reply
    about my story

    well,my story was about how dificult its to learn english. you know why I’m wrote about this topic because when I come from mexico it was dificult to learn other languaje for me but I saw everywhere the people do not speak english usually the hispanic people. but I was interesting to let you know that its so hard when somebody do not know about this country the languaje,culture and others things. it was so hard when I started but I know that everyday I need to learn something not just for me — its because,I would like to go the ARMY. but you know what it was a really great experience because I meet with alot of people, and I had the oportunity to travel and to know more about radio. and I wrote about this topic because in my community. thats what happent with my family, friends,niehgboors too, but you know that this city its from alot of immigrants,like me but my goal its go to the ARMY its my dream and to improve my language.I liked to work with alot of people like MARIANNE Mc CUNE,CZERINA PATEL,CARLOS BRICENO and my mentor MATT ABRAMOVITZ.they are a really nice and cool because when I need them ,they are always support me I love you guys thank you for everything.

  • Judith Rudge

    11.13.01

    Reply
    Life

    Hi there!
    This is Judith writing all the way from Dickinson College in Carlisle, PA. I’m very happy that I got to share my story with more people over the internet. I still perform poetry ocassionally since this College doesnt have that much of a scene. I’m doing the singing thing here, more then ever, I’m supposed to be singing some parts of Gilbert and Sullivans HMS Pinafore next term. If you feel inclined to ask any questions, I’d love to answer them!

    Much Love,
    Judith
    The Queen

  • helen woodward

    11.14.01

    Reply
    Linda

    Brava Linda,

    What a great story. It’s quite humbling–you said so much with such clarity, such brevity. I kept waiting for you to interview Danny and you never did and his absence told half the story. I’m curious about your interviewing process. Who did you originally interview? How hard was it to do a piece on yourself — a piece full of self- awareness but without a smidgen of self-pity? What else are you working on?

    Thank you for your honesty. Thank you for your story.

    Chelsea

  • Carol Wasserman

    11.14.01

    Reply
    Janesse Nieves

    I am speechless after listening, for the very first time, to the work of Janesse Nieves.

    There have been generations of novelists who have toiled for years to produce something with the power, complexity, and intelligence of this piece. Most of them have not been successful in the attempt.

    "My father’s block is full of memories," she begins. It is an amazing strong start. Which moves immediately into the poetry of Nesse’s writing. Lyrical, spare, compelling.

    It would be easy to love this piece because of its subject matter alone. The unsentimental telling of such a harrowing tale would make us willing listeners. But Nesse is an artist. Sure-footed. Economical. There is nothing here which does not belong. There is nothing which sounds false or manipulative. She tells us a story, a horrifying story, with such self-awareness and beauty that we find ourselves marveling at the sound of her voice, her intellect, her vision. We almost forget that this is autobiography – it might as well be a Flemish painting.

    And wonderfully produced. Astonishingly professional. How? How does she do this?

    But just as we are catching our breath, reeling from the images of a small child hoisted over a fence, of a crazy-looking man with a shopping cart full of cans – "Poland Springs, Pepsi" – she surprises us with the sound of Poppy’s voice!

    We are frozen. Stunned. She says, "But you’re a heroin addict." It is a moment in which time stops. We who listen cannot believe that there is a young woman of such composed generosity, who will make art from these raw materials.

    Who will tell us that her father "wanted to buy me cookies, but didn’t have the money."

    But wait! Just when we think we cannot bear another moment of such intense experience, she pulls us away. She takes us to the cool, safe space of a therapist’s office, where we may regain our balance while he explains that none of this is her fault.

    "I don’t know if I’ll ever really believe that," she says. And stops. Letting a deep silence have the last word.

  • Linda123

    11.14.01

    Reply
    responding back to Anne

    Thank you anne for listening to my story. I really appreciate it. The story was very strong and emotional for me but at the same time I knew how to control my feeling and knew how to deal with my past. A lot of people do stupid things to themselves for reasons that people don’t know about, but it’s good for people to learn to communicate with others that care and that will listen. For my situation I didn’t have months of therpy or I didn’t have to take medication I just realize everything when I was in the hospital. People have different reactions but I hope others that hear my story could look at me as a good example and realize that they could help themselves and make themselves very happy and move on with there life and make something of themselves like I did. Thank you anne for taking your time to listen to my story and if you would like to write back feel free to. Thank you!
    Take care
    Linda

  • karla saavedra

    11.14.01

    Reply
    my english situation

    well,I do my story bacause my situation in my life its dificult when I came from mexico I don’t know about english but I try everyday to learn something and I do this topic because in my community thats what happent but I enjoyed this work so much because I learned about radio, and I though that it was interesthing topic because in this city there’s alot of immigrants like me and I know how they feeling because its hard when you don’t this language.

  • Linda123

    11.14.01

    Reply
    responding back to helen woodward

    Hi helen. how are you doing? well about the danny situation I didn’t feel comfortable interviewing him because of personal reasons but I also didn’t want him to feel to great about himself knowing that a girl tryed to kill herself over him. I don’t give a guy so much credit. even though we stood as friends I just didn’t feel comfortable, my side of the story was good enough because it was what I was going through, how I felt and what happen during the process of the hospital and afterwards. honestly interviewing myself wasn’t hard It was like if I was telling this story to one of my friends. It didn’t bother me because it was a stage that I went through when I was young and I learned by my mistakes I guess thats why I am the way I am today. I felt this was a good story because it could relate to a lot of people young and old and I didn’t feel sorry for myself because there wasn’t no reason to, doing this story made me feel good and it release a part of me that stood inside of me all these years and by doing this story made me feel stronger. I’m going to be a mother to be, Im engaged, I got a education and continuing it for a better future for me and my future baby and I am very happy and to me that what counts it’s good to let go something personal about your past That’s what I learned. Right now I am not working on another story at this point I’m responding back to people to who post messages on the message board but maybe in the future I will do a story again if god promits it. Thank you helen for listening to my story and writing to me hope to hear from you soon.
    take care
    Linda

  • Jay Allison

    11.15.01

    Reply
    what you remember

    Is it true that what you remember about a radio piece is what was most important? Maybe not, but it must at least be true that a radio piece, like any experience, is of questionable worth if you remember nothing about it.

    Each of these pieces gave me something to remember. Thanks. Here’s what sticks with me:

    Macho: You talking to the teacher and the difference in your voices. The moment you paused and shared responsibility for what happened. The quiet energy in your voice. You reading out loud.

    Janesse: You standing outside your father’s door and knocking. The smell in the place. The peeing in the bottle story. You saying "Guess what?" in narration. The end of your conversation with your father. The strength of your tone.

    Judith: Your immediate vocal authority. Black is not a country. Your poetry and singing and wanting to hear more. "…It’s just my voice."

    Karla: How your achievement in telling the story was the story. Your singing Metallica with your writing at the end.

    Linda: The simple fact of your willingness to tell what happened and how helpful it might be to some other person who hears it. Your mother’s voice. The doctor’s objective notes. Your strong ending.

    Everyone: You spoke so openly. I remember the very way you tell your stories and how different it sounds than what’s out there on the air, at least on public radio. In fact, the announcer who introduces the pieces reinforces that disconnection.

    I hope your mentors will drop by and that you can tell us something together about your process. Like, how did you work on your writing and delivery?

    by the way, I liked hearing Jesus’ gun story on Marketplace yesterday… and I’ll remember this line: "If I have to see you dead in your coffin, I’m going to kill you."

  • Judith Rudge

    11.15.01

    Reply
    Remembering

    You’ve remembered the parts of the story where our souls danced across our faces, only you somehow heard it through a change in tone, a change in timbre,a pause, you remembered the very center of each piece, you remebered the truth.

  • Linda123

    11.15.01

    Reply
    responding back to jay allison

    Thank you a lot for listening to all of our stories we all tryed our best in them. We were honest and very openly to our stories. I’m glad you took your time to write in the discussion board. Thanks a lot for your support.

  • Czerina Patel

    11.16.01

    Reply
    Missing the Rookies

    Seeing all our wonderful "Rookie Graduates" posting on this site, I am feeling very nostalgic. Even though I’ve spoken to them all in the past few weeks, I miss the days of trying to track them down (ha ha)

    Seriously though, you guys are wonderful, and I’m so glad you are talking with people about your experiences in reporting and radio. We miss you when we don’t see you, but we don’t forget.

    Jay talked about the things he remembered… Well, this is what I remember:

    Karla – Karla you continue to amaze me. I am glad you are working on another story right now. In your "ENGLISH" story, you suppressed your fear of speaking in English – in workshop, in your story, all the time…You beat your shyness and showed great courage when you took your mic to the streets, and when you decided to share your singing with the world. Karla you seemed to know exactly how you were going to report your story from the beginning, and you seemed instinctually to know what to record. I am so happy you keep doing radio. You are a fantastic reporter. I will never forget in San Francisco how scared you were of being interviewed on a radio station, yet you did it. I will never forget how patient you were reading your narration again and again, yet you did it. You spoke to a group of students, a group of WNYC listeners — even though you were so nervous. You are so brave and you are so beautiful – inside and out.

    Macho – You are one of the sweetest young men. I know I can always amuse you with my goofy dancing:) Macho, you tried so hard in your story to deal with things you preferred not to think about – You are a courageous and kind guy. You are so talented and I hope your story helped you see your potential. It was so hard to do it, but you got that interview with your principal. I will always remember how open you were when you told me your story. You are someone who is tough and sensitive at the same time. And you watch too much WWF πŸ™‚ Macho, one thing we want to see happen is you getting that GED. Keep putting your mind to it, and you can do it. You too have gotten your voice out there – you played your story to others at the conference in San Francisco, you were interviewed on ON THE LINE and shared your experiences. You can do anything if you try and set your mind to it. I can’t wait to see you again December 15th!

    Judith, the poet, the model:) Judith, even though you had to fit Radio Rookies in between your job, your poetry slams, your pre-college meetings, you did it! I’m not surprised. You’re such a star – your strong mind, your poetic grace, your determination all worked to help you produce a story that still leaves me singing "Where is the shirt that matches to my pants?" You know the rest! I know how far you’re going to college and in life. I’ll always remember that time in workshop when you read us your first rhyme. Wow! It was a first impression that has lasted. Can’t wait to see you December 15th, and maybe Thanksgiving weekend?

    Linda. Wow, could anyone have been more focused in getting their story done? You just sat at that computer and typed away, even when the others were trying to distract you. But that’s you – when you put your mind to it, you can do anything. We’re so proud that you just got your GED. You are so smart and talented. People love the way you are not scared to speak your mind – your story leaves an impression on them. I’ll always remember that subway trip to the radio station when we talked about all the things you could do in your life. I know you can do anything. I hope you keep moving forward. Proud of you Lindy. Keep it real!

    Nesse. Well, what can I say? No-one could ever have guessed how much you would grow from doing your story. I will never forget the fear you had before you interviewed your dad, and the pain you expressed afterwards. But your courage prevailed, and your story continues to move people. You continue to learn so much every step of the way. I will always remember how you cried in Chicago when you dedicated your radio award to your dad. Nesse, you don’t only have a great voice. You’re an amazing writer. I remember how you sat down and started writing your script. I was just amazed at how poetic you are. You know how proud we are. You just continue to blow me away. I hope you keep doing radio even though I know you are "keeping your options over." You keep overcoming major obstacles, and shining through like the star you are. I can’t wait to show you the photos of Chicago – you are beaming!

    All of you Rookies, and all the other Rookies, you are a pleasure to work with. You keep us young, and you keep us real. You teach us and help us explore the world and this city. Keep asking questions. Keep writing. Keep using your beautiful voices. See you all December 15th!!! I hope other teens who read this will listen to the Radio Rookies stories, and then realize that they too have powerful voices. And teens, if you want, go to http://www.radiorookies.org and sign up – we can tell you when we’ll be in your hood. Maybe we can help you tell the rest of us your stories. Rookies, thank you for letting us all into your lives. Much love, and peace. Cee-zee (AKA "Taz"erina)

  • Czerina Patel

    11.16.01

    Reply
    p.s.

    I just wanted to mention to Karla that your English is so great – You have improved so much — even though you try to pretend you don’t understand when I’m asking you to do something you don’t feel like doing (ha ha)

    Karla, mi coroson…. (you know the rest!) πŸ™‚

  • Linda123

    11.18.01

    Reply
    responding back to czerina

    even though you was always on our ass its good to have such a good experience and learn different things that sometimes we never get offered such an opportunity I’m happy that you are pround of me and there will be much more that you and marianne will be pround of. Thanks for your nice remark.

  • jonathan menjivar

    11.18.01

    Reply
    help us

    If I say some of the same things that others have said already it’s just because they’re true. Your voices sound so refreshing. Your stories are all delivered with such ease. What I like about all your pieces is:

    #1 how open and honest they are
    AND
    #2 how good it makes them

    It’s clear we all have a lot to learn from you. It’s exciting to see some of you posting and hopefully it means you’ll answer a few questions. What did you know about this type of radio before you made your pieces and how do you think that affected how you told your story? Were you scared to turn on the tape recorder? Scared to tell people your story? Whether you know it or not, you broke rules…this is a good thing. What can you tell us about not being afraid to break rules?

    I guess I’m just struck by how these pieces don’t follow the rules of public radio OR copy the structure of other rule breakers and I want a clue to how that was done. I hope you all keep making stories. We need you.

  • Linda123

    11.19.01

    Reply
    responding back to johnathan menjivar

    Well Johnathan to get started I’m going to answer the questions you asked but for my story. Well I never heard of the radio station that played my story I only hear FM radio, but I didn’t know nothing about radio except hearing it. To me the radio station didn’t have any affect on me or anything to my story because of the simple fact I felted comfortable telling it and to me it felted as if I was telling this story to one of my friends, the only thing that kind of bothered me was if my story was going to come out good and some things that I didn’t want to say in the story but was kind of confenced, but it was alright. I wasn’t scared to turn on the tape recorder, honestly to me it was fun because I never had an experience like that and like I said before I wasn’t scared to tell my story for particular reasons. Like 1- I’m not the only person that tryed to commit suicide, 2- I’m not embarressed of my actions that took place during that time because unfortunilly I’m still alive and I learned by that experience, the thought in the head of wondering how it will feel to kill myself or what will happen to me was already experience and I wouldn’t want to go through it again. So in other words I wasn’t scared I was just telling people my story that happen to me in the past. About the "Breaking Rules" I really don’t understand because I wouldn’t know if I did break a rule or not because it was my first time doing a story for the public. But the only thing that I could say is that to be yourself, tell the story how it was and be creative because it brings out your story. Just be yourself. Don’t change because someone higher than you is telling you to, it’s your story and you tell it how you want it. I hope I answered the questions you have asked but in my behave, from the other’s I don’t know. Thank you for listening to the stories.
    Take Care
    Linda

  • Ian Aronson

    11.19.01

    Reply
    Great Job!

    Macho — Great story. When I was a teenager I thought school was the stupidest thing in the world. Then, as I got older I realized I could study what I wanted. Learning has opened many doors for me, and now I’m a college professor. I can do work that I think is important, and an education can provide you with similar opportunities. Good luck with whatever you do in the future, and great job telling your story.

    Linda — You are so brave. By sharing your story you are helping people, perhaps far more than you know. Your advice at the end of the piece is very true and I’m very glad to hear you say that. Good work, and I look forward to hearing what you come up with next.

  • Viki Merrick

    11.20.01

    Reply
    Rules and more

    I was at the Chicago conference and there was this vibrating edge around the whole scene and I figured it out – it was the youth scene. I was blown away by Janesse’s piece, and by the stuff she emanated when I met her – courage and honesty and a search of poetry.
    Jay came home with the goods from Radio Rookies and I had a fest listening because what I was feeling at the conference came back. The whole concept of the "authoritative voice" was turned upside down for me during the youth panel at the conference and this time, back home listening, I settled into that upside down place – quite comfortably. If mainstream public radio has grown dull it is because it is formulated, practised, careful, and often snotty. Every piece from the radio rookies is the opposite. Those who speak either know what they know or they openly are searching for the answer. There is no pretense of assumed knowledge, no one is afraid of saying what they are looking for or tackling or struggling with. The pre-conceived standard is simply SHATTERED. Like Studs Terkel says, something real.
    ALL OF YOU: Linda, Macho, Karla, Nesse (BoriquasBeauty) and Judith: in each of your pieces one thing struck me was a surprising sense of clarity that often doesn’t come for years after (- like in therapy after age 50 !) Do you think telling a story, especially a radio story (which is more intimate), your real story, forces you to detach or to step outside and line up all the elements like an outsider might? Each of you seems to have checked all sides of your issue -pros and cons. Did the clarity come with the telling?
    Have any of you thought or tried to tell someone else’s story since these pieces were made?

    Macho: the thing I liked best was how willing you were to show you weren’t so sure about how you’d done things. How can we not respect that? Your interview with the Principal had no trace of hostility or attitude. You were looking for that side of the story and even though it was YOUR story, you were backed off enough so she wasn’t overly defensive. That’s a big deal. Otherwise you couldn’t get anything honest out of her. Or yourself either. I could see you sitting there.

    Linda: Your story was so intense and terse – it was disarming. No curtains, no furniture kind of story. You have a lot of gumption and it leaves me wondering what you want to do next – in radio?
    You answered the question I was going to post after Jonathan which was did any of you know there were rules, sort of unspoken rules? I guess not. It speaks highly of your mentors. No one tried to corral you into a form. I’d like it if you guys could all talk a little more about what went down between you and your mentors in shaping your pieces.

    Czerina, what about that issues of rules. Did you start out consciously saying we won’t impose any rules except maybe the 5 prohibited words?
    You are obviously an ace supporter of all these “rookies” – were you careful? Did you hold back with your own vision of what these stories should be?

    Judith: In spite of any difficulties you might have slammed into, I suspect that little would have quieted your voice. Thank God. You have things to say well worth listening to. It seems like your voice takes wing in a closed or restricted scenario. When you said there wasn’t much of a “scene” at college I thought whoa, I wonder what will come out of THAT. Let us know.

    Karla: Your piece was irresistible – like Jay said the feat of telling your story WAS the story. I was listening, cheering you on. You must know by now, your feelings, your struggle and determination to catch up to the language, the culture were like background rhythm to the fact that you were doing it – speaking and gathering. Like two melodies playing at once, not harmony but pulling and pushing at each other – more like counterpoint. Czerina said you are doing another story….we’ll be waiting

    Nesse: We met at the awards – so you know how moved I was by your piece. Your mix of practical and poetry is stunning. It is there in the piece, it was boldly there in dedicating your award to your father. I really wish you would say something here on the Transom about the rule thing. Your story was about you, but obviously not just you and so there were a lot of other kind of unspoken rules to deal with. Your father got pissed off at the confrontation, what about your brother and your mother? And your mentors. There’s a ton of different sorts of rules to deal with. But you stuck with YOUR OWN VOICE. Your take, your search. Did you ever want to back down? Do it in another way? You surely chose the more difficult path, but the better one and we are glad of it.

  • Judith Rudge

    11.20.01

    Reply
    College

    I’m learning a lot about myself here in college, i’m learning that I need to be stronger than I thought I had to be. I’m learning that poetry, opera, and just my plain old self, will be stifled here in this school that I’m attending. Though I’m grateful to be going to college, I wonder what adversity my life has waiting for me. I struggle, and the struggle doesnt stop. I must be a ghost

  • Carol Wasserman

    11.21.01

    Reply
    Some Thoughts on the Radio Rookies

    It is the day before Thanksgiving. After a long, slow, sweet autumn I woke to a hard frost and the sound of my old furnace making a valiant attempt to blow warm air up through the vents in the floor. I got dressed and out to the car. Drove to the gas station for three dollars worth of regular, and to the grocery store. I needed to be there early, before the place filled up with people like me who hadn’t gotten around to buying apples and Crisco and a brick of cheddar cheese, all of which are required here to make a decent pie to bring with you when you show up for dinner.

    Even at six-thirty in the cold morning the grocery store was full of life and purposeful activity. The shelves were being stocked, the produce arranged in tidy pyramids, the aisles swept, the stale racks filled with yesterday’s bagels. Someone was facing cans over in the small section which is labeled "Ethnic Foods". Fish sauce, black beans, pickled chili peppers. Someone was filling the freezer case with vanilla ice cream. Which reminded me that not everyone likes smelly cheddar cheese with their apple pie.

    So I bought ice cream, too.

    And came home, and listened to more of the Radio Rookies. These beautiful children, our precious kids, who make us glad to be alive, who make us feel buoyant and hopeful. Part of the story of the Radio Rookies is that long shameful one of systemic inequality and lousy public schools. It seems a miracle, when we listen to these pieces which are delivered to us as gifts, that art of such purity and force could come from the hard circumstances into which the Radio Rookies were born. But that is only the easily digested part of the story. The obvious, facile reaction to the surprise of their amazing talents.

    But they stand, each one of them, on giants’ shoulders. They did not appear suddenly from nowhere. They come from families and communities which have struggled against the imposed limitations of economic circumstance and ancient blind prejudice. They speak directly to us, to our hearts, but we also need to remember that they speak for so many others just like them. They are only the visible members of a generation of Americans whose energy and intellect will transform everything. If we listen.

    I’m thankful, this year, that everyone in my small circle of family is safe and well. I’m thankful for this job. I’m thankful for apples and Crisco and for the choice of cheese or ice cream.

    And not the least among the things for which I am grateful this year are the Radio Rookies. Who give me reason to believe that the future is in good hands. That they, and their sisters and brothers, will run the joint with wisdom and focus and compassion.

    That the future will be a lovely place for the rest of us to grow old in.

  • jonathan katz

    11.21.01

    Reply
    for linda cuevos

    first of all, sorry if i got your last name wrong. spelling is not my strenth. i listened to your story and was reminded that even though i’m fifty four (funny you don’t sound fifty four), married with kids, that you and i are not that different. thank you for the reminder.

    i have been making my living with my voice for more than ten years and there is nothing i do that you can’t. please stay at it.

    jonathan katz

  • Carol Wasserman

    11.21.01

    Reply
    Karla Saavedra

    Karla Saavedra has the most wonderful delivery I have ever heard – her voice rises in a sweet swoopy arc when she wants to emphasize the importance of something she is saying. She speaks carefully and deliberately. We understand every word. And wish we ourselves were bilingual, so that we could hear just how extraordinarily poetic she must be in her mother tongue.

    Karla might be surprised to know how many of us speak only the one language of our birth. She may not realize how intimidated we are by those bright lights who have learned a second language. I have only the pathetic remains of some high school French at my disposal. It would be impossible for me to make myself understood anyplace in the French-speaking world. The only people who might be able to figure out what I was trying to say would be other survivors of Mrs. Tupper’s long-vanished teaching career.

    So I listen to Karla’s eloquence with great respect and admiration.

    And I have the greatest respect for her determination to learn English. For the sacrifices she makes in order to succeed. For her ferocious focus.

    She says she does not have time for a boyfriend because she wants to study and do her homework. She watches "English TV" and "English radio" in order to learn as much as she can. We hear her singing – even when she makes such joyful noise it is because she wants to own the words, not the music.

    She tells us, way back at the very beginning of her piece, why learning this second language is so important to her. In the graceful telling of her story, we forget. But she reminds us, finally, that she is driven by the need to make sure that "the next time I have to call 911 I will be more prepared".

    Which is a perfect example of, among other fine things, what writers call ‘the narrative arc’.

  • Linda123

    11.21.01

    Reply
    responding back to Ian Aronson

    Thank you very much Ian for listening to my story and thank you for the compliment. I’m glad that my story is helping a lot of people out there and my advice came from the bottom of my heart because i wouldn’t want nobody to hurt themselves physically.I guess from a young person’s mind it’s not bad advice I just try to keep it real.thank you.
    take care
    Linda

  • Linda123

    11.21.01

    Reply
    responding to carol wasserman

    Well carol it’s good to hear what you did this morning, which is alright. It’s kind of nice. I’m kind of glad that some older people are starting to think that not all kids are going to be mess up’s when they grow up because I know a lot of young people today that want a good future, in my behave you are good in the future.thanks for thinking positive about us and for your compliments. We all appreciate it. thanks.
    take care
    Linda

  • Linda123

    11.21.01

    Reply
    responding back to johnathan katz

    thank you johnathan for that wonderful quote. i don’t mind that you spelled my last name wrong it’s ok, I get that alot. i never thought that an older person and i have some common things. if you don’t mind i would like to know what I reminded you about. But if it was for something positive, I’m glad. Thanks for writing to me. This is like the first message that I got that put a SMILE ON MY FACE. thanks.
    take care.
    linda

  • Linda123

    11.21.01

    Reply
    responding back to Viki merrick

    Just to start, I’m going to answer your questions for my behave. first-no! to me I just try to keep it real, say everything that was true about the story, put it all together, and try to make the best of it. To me insider or outsider, I just tried to be me. Well I didn’t really have to check alot of things, I had my mom, myself, the doctor that treated me and my thoughts. No! I haven’t told nobody else’s stories, I don’t know why but I didn’t. don’t know what I am going to do next. I never really thought about that. but what went down between me and my mentor. well I had a women named Subrata come by and she talked to me like asking me about my story help me put it together but I didn’t really see her alot. well with Czerina and Marianne including Carlos, they were big helps, I was a quick learner, so basically once I learned how to use protools, I just went ahead and started doing my story, I just knew where to put all the things at, with a little help from Czerina and Marianne, but it came out good and I tried my best. but they were always there helping you, answering any questions that you asked and they were fun to work with, they are very good mentors. But they were a great help and thanks to them I have a good story that a lot of people like. thanks for writing in the message board.
    take care
    Linda

  • Janesse Nieves

    11.24.01

    Reply
    It’s got to be real

    I think if you gaze at your computer long enough you can find the Matrix , no. The purpose of my story was for people to ".. look into my eyes and see what I see.."-Mary J.Blige.I still try to find ways to help but I just don’t want to any more, I’m tired. have my life to worry about, I’ve recently been diagnosed with Diabetes and I think how funny it is that I worried so much about my father’s health but I’m the one who got sick. The story I guess was my way of letting go the irateness I had for so long. My response to all messages are Thank you very much I’m happy that the story touch you in whichever way it did.

  • helen woodward

    11.25.01

    Reply
    Macho

    Hi Macho,

    What a great piece. Your objectivity and generosity is refreshing, admirable. What do I mean by generosity? I guess what I’m getting at is that it’s impressive that you took a personal experience and turned it over to something much larger. That someone with your maturity, that someone with your analytic mind dropped out of high school–that alone is profound.

    (I hope you get to travel and that you’ll take recording equipment with you.)

  • helen woodward

    11.25.01

    Reply
    Nesse

    Hi Nesse, I’m still reacting to your piece on an emotional level (this makes it hard to articulate anything coherent.) You are a great story teller, choreographer. Your writing is so simple and poetic. Your words (describing the hot day and fire- hydrant) are as effective as patches of sound (your brother singing about spaghetti sauce). Both give my ear and mind’s eye an equal amount to ponder and it all bounces so beautifully off of one another. I guess the fluidity of your story continues to surprise me. It’s so elegant. The elegance is what I love; the recurrence of bottles, your father collecting them, you having to pee in one–gosh there are so many ironies and truths tucked away in this larger tale. I could endlessly froth over this but I’m afraid I’m not making much sense. What I do want you to know is that I love this story–I think about it often and I’m so glad you found radio or that radio found you–Chelsea Merz

  • helen woodward

    11.25.01

    Reply
    Karla

    Hi Karla,

    Wow, another great story. You do a really good job at capturing a sense of anxiety and frustration. ( I always got lost the first day of school and that’s as an American who has always lived in America. ) With simplicity you say a lot about the additional stress of moving to a new country and with grace you reveal that no one makes assimilating an easy or easier process. The part that gets me though is your singing along with Metallica–it’s so expressive (why is Metallica your favorite band?) What are you working on now?

    I’ve been listening to you, the Radio Rookies, a lot in the last few days. To know that a story with personality, conviction and compassion can be told without self-deprecation, self-pity, irony, sarcasm, anger or rage is a huge revelation. It really is. It’s so admirable. I’ve learned a lot listening to you. Yes, I know this sounds corny but it’s true.–Chelsea Merz

  • Janesse Nieves

    11.26.01

    Reply
    Hello Helen

    Thank you.I adore radio and I feel surprised that I am apart of Radio Rookies.I never thought my story would make such an impact to the public like it did because I assumed it would only get my "procreator" to stop using drugs.I wish I could say that life goes but that’s too simple ,it takes time. I’m sorry to say after my story aired (for those who don’t know) my father was incarcerated for 90 days due to his parole violation. He has since been released into the population of drug-dealers and is now AGAIN on Herion.I can’t say I’m sad because you can’t lose something that’s already lost.".. In the end it doesn’t really matter.."-Linkin Park.

  • Judith Rudge

    11.26.01

    Reply
    Nesse

    Your right "In the end it doesnt even matter"-Linkin Park,
    I’m happy to see you’ve grown, you’ve triumphed and your surviving Nesse, I miss your smile, but I’m one of many arent I? πŸ™‚

    Judith

  • Melissa Brough

    11.26.01

    Reply

    i want to add to the glowing reviews of your work. you really deserve some serious congratulations for being so dedicated and willing to speak out. i’m still in college and am a firm believer that public radio needs more young voices participating.
    which leads me to some of the questions i have for you;
    what motivated to put this amount of time and effort into these pieces?
    who did you hope would hear these pieces?
    what kind of change do you think these kinds of radio pieces might help bring about? had you ever heard anything like it before?
    how have your friends/family who’ve heard these pieces respond?
    do you listen to public radio? would you listen (more) if there were pieces like this aired more regularly?

    sorry to bombard you with questions – i guess i’m mainly interested in whether or not (and how) you feel radio like this could improve your lives and the lives of your family and friends. your work is really inspiring and i truly hope you stick with it or encourage others to do the same.
    thanks for your stories,
    melissa

  • Jay Allison

    11.26.01

    Reply
    Also… the mentor relationship

    I’d like to hear more from both sides about the mentor relationship. Are any of the mentors around? Can we get your perspective?

    How were the collaborations structured, how did the narrative voice emerge in each case, how were tricky editorial choices negotiated?

  • Janesse Nieves

    11.26.01

    Reply
    Rockstar Judith

    Love could possibly be in the air?.I saw you before you left coming from macDonalds and I think you were so caught up with Mr.? you didn’t hear me calling you, all is forgiven.I feel like I missed out on getting to know you even better because I stopped coming to work shop I apologize to you and my fellow rookies from hunts point.For others who read-I stop coming to workshop because I was afraid to be in public due to my "weight problem" but I am happy to confirm that I am now well fitted in my skin.Being heavy I can relate to you when you felt like an outsider.I listen to your story a lot because I love your poetry it gives me comfort.You’ve recently provoked me to hit the books and create my own poetry ,which I hope to share with you one day.Thank you Ms.Judith Rudge for you have that intoxicating effect with your verbalism.Bravo!

  • helen woodward

    11.27.01

    Reply
    I must confess…

    The way that the computer is set up here at transom central means that I, Helen Woodward, have been credited with the eloquent postings of Chelsea Merz above. You have been very gracious in thanking me but unfortunately I didn’t post these messages, I wish I had.
    I have been tortured by my inability to find enough words, the right words to express my admiration for all your work, so much has been said already. Judith responded to Jay’s posting with the following:

    "You’ve remembered the parts of the story where our souls danced across our faces"

    what a turn of phrase, and how exactly on the mark it is. The quality that is present I think, that I admire most is the courageous honesty of each of you.
    Were any of you scared to reveal so much about yourselves? what was it like when you heard yourselves on the airwaves for the first time?

  • Janesse Nieves

    11.27.01

    Reply
    On the airwaves for the first time

    I was certainly frightened to reveal my problems to the public because I was afraid of how they would react to what I was saying.

    When I heard my voice on the radio I was happy. I never thought in a million years that I would be on the radio.

  • Judith Rudge

    11.27.01

    Reply
    Love in the Air(Ness and all others)

    Love has dulled my senses from the outside world, you are very right, but I’m sure it was a break I needed. As for hearing my voice over the air, I didnt…I was sleeping when my story aired πŸ™‚ and I admit that it wasnt a heartbreaking sleep, I wasnt really concerned with hearing my story. I was just happy others heard it, i was happy i was allowed to share 6 minutes of what I thought was and still is ME. change is such a constant thing, thats what I like about radio. I like the fact that for 6 minutes, or for however long your story is, you are YOU, and your listeners and THEM, and for that very moment YOU become THEM, and they become YOU, for 6 minutes you feel like a GOD.

  • Jay Allison

    11.27.01

    Reply
    Bingo

    Quote of the Day Award to Judith Rudge.

  • Macho Lopez

    11.28.01

    Reply
    Message from Czerina (reply to Viki from 11/20) – Macho posted from this computer before, but it’s Czerina now!

    The Rookies basically go out with only 2 rules – fairness and accuracy. Other than that, we push them to get as much tape as possible, to keep their minds open and allow the mic to take them places and to let them have conversations they might not otherwise have. The stories takes shape as the Rookies come back with tape, and start writing. At the beginning, we help them compile their interview lists. One thing that also helps is doing a Q and A with them. We want their stories to be their own and to be told in their own voice, but we do push them a lot — Sometimes they know exactly what makes good radio. Other times, we help them along. For example, some Rookies might think an interview they did with a parent is horrible, but it’s their own bias (perhaps they don’t agree with what the parent said.) We help them see why the interview is not horrible – why or how it may be useful or important or powerful. Every Rookie is different and needs more or less help at different parts of the process. We try to be supportive, helpful and motivational, without interfering with their creativity, voice nor style. For the most part, they sit at the computer, pick out their favorite pieces of tape, put it in. We usually help a bit with story structure. The main thing is to get them to do a lot of recording and a lot of writing. With enough material, and some advice, they are able to put their stories together. They are reminded throughout the workshop (by listening to stories and by our instruction) that good radio lets sound take you there, that honesty and intimacy are powerful, and that it’s their story – to be told in their natural voices. And it’s great to see them putting it all together and producing fresh and powerful stories.

  • Jake Warga

    11.28.01

    Reply
    My Exhausting Thoughts

    Good work to all, kudos to the producers too. Judith, you are a poet, keep at it…in any language. Linda, I’m sympathetic to your struggles (see "When Brian took his life" on Transom Shows) will offer that I would like you to tell me your story rather than read me your story.

    That aside, I don’t want to address people per se. I want to cement my concerns and criticisms about content, not form. The form of radio–music, editing, etc–was great. Stories were told, ideas, situations and conflicts came across clearly. I started to think about the audience though. I hope this IS a new direction in public radio, it’s true all the comments made so far. But these stories were made for a ‘culture’ than its own. I.e.: How many highschool-aged kids blare NPR from their cars or rush home to listen to it at night when music will do just fine? I hope these DO bring a much needed younger audience, not just into consumption, but production of radio. This said, I want to note an observation:

    Most the stories came to the surface because they were ‘heavy’…serious issues. Is the highschool life fairly represented here? Have these stories been heard because they deal with tragic circumstances? What about a young kid that may not have had something weighty happen to them but might have a talent or desire to wrangle the spoken word with music into a tape? I think, and hope, that they will become the producers in search of a story, the ones editing and marketing. Those are only my thoughts, not OF the stories, but inspired BY them.

    Keep at it guys, a microphone is as mighty as a pen or a sword.

  • Macho Lopez

    11.28.01

    Reply
    Quick reply to Jake from Czerina

    Jake, thanks for your good points. I too hope that more and more young people will start reporting –and start listening —to public radio. Just want to let you know that you can hear more Rookies stories on our web-site: http://www.radiorookies.org
    While many stories are serious (struggles are often powerful stories, and teens have many weighty things on their minds/in their lives), you will also find others stories (less heavy) such as Hunts Point Rookie David Sealey’s report on his dream to become a superstar or Harlem Rookie Jimmy’s about grafitti. Harlem Rookie Janelle looked at her identity in "Trini-American" and Harlem Rookie Kady reported on Gays and Lesbians in Harlem. When the Flushing Rookies’ stories air next month, you will get to hear Linda’s story on wanting to become an anchor woman or Heidi’s looking at why her parents worry so much about her.I don’t think Judith or Karla’s stories are particularly heavy – they do deal with struggle, yet the feeling I’m left with after hearing them is more free than weighed down. Regardless, you should know that every Rookie who has completed a story in workshop has had it aired. The stories are heard because the Rookies learn how to tell stories that are interesting and important in ways that work for radio and radio listeners. Certainly, there must be a good story idea to work from, but every teen has many of those. In no way are they required or forced to tell only heavy or tragic stories. We hope that from each workshop, the Rookies stories give some kind of picture of that neighborhood. And all together, the Rookies stories represent teen life, teen concerns and bring their issues (good and bad) into new and fresh light.

  • Judith Rudge

    11.29.01

    Reply
    Heavy

    Highschool was indeed not full of tragedy and struggle, but added to the change in timbre of radio i think that radio rookies as a program empowers the voices of those teens in highschools and community’s where the voices of youngsters arent heard, or accepted as valuable, there are some really great fun radio rookie stories that I’ve heard, but I think the ones about struggle just stick out more, becuase everyone relates to struggle, and pain. its the one common denominator amongst all races and casts.

  • Matt Lieber

    12.02.01

    Reply
    Voice Box

    There was a piece on Fresh Air the other day on the history of the computer generated voice, which has generally been imitative of the human voice, but with nothing approaching the natural tone or the subtle inflections of a real human voice (It’s the tin man without the heart). As part of the piece, a number of cuts from various computer voices were played and they were all bloodless. And then, right after the piece, an announcer from the local NPR station came on and read a soundbite, or a billboard, which previewed the upcoming program and gave a weather update and so on.
    Well, you see where this is going… Which is which?

    I think the power of these stories lies in voice. There’s been a lot written here about the institutional, calcified voice of Public Radio, and how these Radio Rookies stories serve as a kind of antidote to that. That seems to me to be exactly right. The real punch in these pieces, and the moment I liked most—and it’s a similar moment in almost all the stories—is when we hear the narrator’s voice placed beside the voice of some kind of authority figure– the reserved, calculated speech of an adult.

    Linda, in your story it’s the doctor. You say “I took Mad Pills” and he says “patient ingested….” Or when you’re thinking back on what happened, you say “I realized what I did was stupid.” The doctor, in the very next line, says “Patient states that her actions prior to admission were quote, stupid, closed quote.” And we hear the doctor clinically flipping through the pages of his report. The difference in tone here makes your voice much stronger, more elegant. This is artistry.

    Karla, in your story it’s the security guard at school who, when he can’t understand you, yells at you in English and sends you to the principal. Your description of the school, the labyrinth of hallways and floors, was great. It made me see you.

    Macho, you give us your old principal, who tells us that the problems at school are that kids show up late, or they don’t show up at all, and that they steal books. Then you do something really great, you kind of acknowledge that yes, that may be true, but that there’s a bigger story to be told about why kids don’t show up for school, and what they do instead. The bigger story is what you tell, and tell to great effect.

    Janesse, somewhere in the middle of your story you say “My plan was to tell Poppy that I loved him, but I let my anger take over instead.” This is the difference between self awareness and self consciousness. Which I think is something very important about these stories, yours especially. Self Awareness in a story is always good, self consciousness (self consciousness about the story itself and about the manner in which its being told) can be tiresome.

    The computer generated voice is hyper-self conscious and completely un-self aware.

    Here’s to the human voice.

    Well done.

  • Judith Rudge

    12.03.01

    Reply
    Macho

    We didnt get to have much of a conversation, but the small part of you I did get to know was compelling enough to make me listen to your story at least 3 times. Bravo indeed, and as a fellow radio rookie its probably not as explosive, but bravo!

    Judith
    The Queen

  • Viki Merrick

    12.04.01

    Reply
    Czerina

    Thanks for answering – your response made me feel really full inside (and kind of envious) what a scene ! By the way, what the hell is going on Dec. 15th? You guys having a reunion?

    By your description, by the work these rookies produced you all achieved exactly what you set out to do. It is obvious the mentors are not heavy-handed – each voice and story was unique in it’s movement and display. letting them go and not letting them turn away is a lovely prescription for an incomparably honest and moving outcome.

    About "heaviness" – maybe the grown-ups are over-reacting about how intense the stories are – maybe we all forget there are a lot of intense stories for teens. But really? Many of the stories presented from Rookies on Transom were HUGE. life-changing. I asked Nesse if she thinks or looks at the world in terms of story now and she said an amazing thing: "yes I look at things with more of wanting to know what the base for meaning is. For example I can look at a CAR DRIVING PASS ME and wonder what’s their life like." I was SO excited by her response, I mean her poetic sense applied to any story…, it would be difficult for me not to hound her to come back…

    After the all-encompassing task of telling such stories – do you struggle to get them back to tell more or different kinds of stories? Do they feel like they’re done, completed "the project", or are they mulling over another story to tell?

    HEY ROOKIES, what’s next?

  • Judith Rudge

    12.04.01

    Reply
    next

    Escape from the plastic world of college.

  • Linda123

    12.04.01

    Reply
    responding back to matt lieber

    thank you matt, I tryed real hard on my story and we figure that it would make the story sound and feel stronger in that way.thank you.
    take care
    linda

  • Janesse Nieves

    12.06.01

    Reply
    Next projecto

    I plan on doing my next story on Diabetes which is an illness I have.

  • Czerina Patel

    12.07.01

    Reply
    Reply to Viki

    Hi Viki,

    Yes, we’re having a holiday party for all the Rookies on the 15th – it’s going to be fun! If you are going to be in NY, you are more than welcome.

    The Rookies, as you’ve seen, are encouraged and continue to work on other stories and projects after the workshop is done. They have to take more initiative, but many of them decide to do more radio, and we try to make that happen. Nesse did a story (which aired nationally) about her media diet. That was lighter than "Heroin" for sure. Janelle (from the Harlem workshop) is working on a story about hair right now. Some of them have been involved in projects interviewing people from Botswana or Sierra Leone. Hunts Point Rookie David did a commentary on Michael Jordan. Many did commentaries on the WTC tragedy. I hope we will hear a lot more from all of them. They know how much we love their stuff!

  • Janesse Nieves

    12.13.01

    Reply
    message

    Merry christmas and Happy new year to all.

  • Jay Allison

    12.13.01

    Reply

    And to YOU, Nesse.

  • mryanm

    12.15.01

    Reply
    to Macho

    Hey Macho!
    I really liked your radio piece. I feel you on all the trouble you had with the school you went to. I’m a teacher in oakland and you seem like a lot of the kids i work with. I am going to use your piece in my class, if that’s cool with you.

    keep up your hard work! you are making some great stuff. not only for you, but for others too.

    thanks,
    ryan

  • operations

    1.10.02

    Reply
    Merry Xmas from the Rookies

  • Nannette Drake Oldenbourg

    1.14.02

    Reply

    I’m glad you put up this photo. It’s fun. There’s so much personality in it. Every time it pops up I notice someone else. (Like today I have to smile back at the poet in the eye of the storm.)

  • Heather

    1.16.02

    Reply
    to Judith

    I loved your piece. You have a real ear for sound and your experiences show up clearly. Keep up the great work and I wish you all the best in the world.

  • Czerina

    2.01.02

    Reply
    Thanks for listening

    I hope you guys will check out our Flushing stories – they’re on the RR web-site. Once again, the Rookies worked really hard and produced compelling radio. It’s so great that the Rookies have been able to share insights with all of you here on Transom. Thanks!

  • Bernard Skelton

    4.29.02

    Reply
    radio rookies

    how yar doin we met in tha summer time at sound portraits offices. wegot tha chance 2 listen & learn what it takes 2 put a piece 2 gether . yar keep doin what yar been doin keep up tha good work & stay strong everybody . peace!!!!!

  • Janesse Nieves

    5.04.02

    Reply
    hi
  • MACHO

    10.21.02

    Reply

    hey thanks and i hope your kids ilke the story and learn from my mistake and maybe you can have the kids write to me about my story.
    you can email at radiorookies@wnyc.org.and im going to find a GED progam.

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